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SCI Publications

2017


M. Berzins, D. A. Bonnell, Jr. Cizewski, K. M. Heeger, A.J.G. Hey, C. J. Keane, B. A. Ramsey, K. A. Remington, J.L. Rempe. “Department of Energy, Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC), Subcommittee on LDRD Review Final Report,” May, 2017.



C. Gritton, J. Guilkey, J. Hooper, D. Bedrov, R. M. Kirby, M. Berzins. “Using the material point method to model chemical/mechanical coupling in the deformation of a silicon anode,” In Modelling and Simulation in Materials Science and Engineering, Vol. 25, No. 4, pp. 045005. 2017.

ABSTRACT

The lithiation and delithiation of a silicon battery anode is modeled using the material point method (MPM). The main challenges in modeling this process using the MPM is to simulate stress dependent diffusion coupled with concentration dependent stress within a material that undergoes large deformations. MPM is chosen as the numerical method of choice because of its ability to handle large deformations. A method for modeling diffusion within MPM is described. A stress dependent model for diffusivity and three different constitutive models that fully couple the equations for stress with the equations for diffusion are considered. Verifications tests for the accuracy of the numerical implementations of the models and validation tests with experimental results show the accuracy of the approach. The application of the fully coupled stress diffusion model implemented in MPM is applied to modeling the lithiation and delithiation of silicon nanopillars.



J. K. Holmen, A. Humphrey, D. Sutherland, M. Berzins. “Improving Uintah's Scalability Through the Use of Portable Kokkos-Based Data Parallel Tasks,” In Proceedings of the Practice and Experience in Advanced Research Computing 2017 on Sustainability, Success and Impact, New Orleans, LA, USA, PEARC17, No. 27, ACM, New York, NY, USA pp. 27:1--27:8. 2017.
ISBN: 978-1-4503-5272-7
DOI: 10.1145/3093338.3093388

ABSTRACT

The University of Utah's Carbon Capture Multidisciplinary Simulation Center (CCMSC) is using the Uintah Computational Framework to predict performance of a 1000 MWe ultra-supercritical clean coal boiler. The center aims to utilize the Intel Xeon Phi-based DOE systems, Theta and Aurora, through the Aurora Early Science Program by using the Kokkos C++ library to enable node-level performance portability. This paper describes infrastructure advancements and portability improvements made possible by our integration of Kokkos within Uintah. Scalability results are presented that compare serial and data parallel task execution models for a challenging radiative heat transfer calculation, central to the center's predictive boiler simulations. These results demonstrate both good strong-scaling characteristics to 256 Knights Landing (KNL) processors on the NSF Stampede system, and show the KNL-based calculation to compete with prior GPU-based results for the same calculation.

Keywords: Hybrid Parallelism, Knights Landing, Kokkos, MIC, Many-Core, Parallel, Portability, Radiation Modeling, Reverse Monte-Carlo Ray Tracing, Scalability, Stampede, Uintah, Xeon Phi



T.A.J. Ouermi, A. Knoll, R.M. Kirby, M. Berzins. “OpenMP 4 Fortran Modernization of WSM6 for KNL,” In Proceedings of the Practice and Experience in Advanced Research Computing 2017 on Sustainability, Success and Impact, New Orleans, LA, USA, PEARC17, No. 12, ACM, New York, NY, USA pp. 12:1--12:8. 2017.
ISBN: 978-1-4503-5272-7
DOI: 10.1145/3093338.3093387

ABSTRACT

Parallel code portability in the petascale era requires modifying existing codes to support new architectures with large core counts and SIMD vector units. OpenMP is a well established and increasingly supported vehicle for portable parallelization. As architectures mature and compiler OpenMP implementations evolve, best practices for code modernization change as well. In this paper, we examine the impact of newer OpenMP features (in particular OMP SIMD) on the Intel Xeon Phi Knights Landing (KNL) architecture, applied in optimizing loops in the single moment 6-class microphysics module (WSM6) in the US Navy's NEPTUNE code. We find that with functioning OMP SIMD constructs, low thread invocation overhead on KNL and reduced penalty for unaligned access compared to previous architectures, one can leverage OpenMP 4 to achieve reasonable scalability with relatively minor reorganization of a production physics code.

Keywords: Knights Landing, openMP, overhead, parallel, thread parallelism, vector parallelism, weather forecasting


2016


J. Beckvermit, T. Harman, C. Wight, M. Berzins. “Physical Mechanisms of DDT in an Array of PBX 9501 Cylinders Initiation Mechanisms of DDT,” SCI Institute, April, 2016.

ABSTRACT

The Deflagration to Detonation Transition (DDT) in large arrays (100s) of explosive devices is investigated using large-scale computer simulations running the Uintah Computational Framework. Our particular interest is understanding the fundamental physical mechanisms by which convective deflagration of cylindrical PBX 9501 devices can transition to a fully-developed detonation in transportation accidents. The simulations reveal two dominant mechanisms, inertial confinement and Impact to Detonation Transition. In this study we examined the role of physical spacing of the cylinders and how it influenced the initiation of DDT.



J. Beckvermit, T. Harman, C. Wight,, M. Berzins. “Packing Configurations of PBX-9501 Cylinders to Reduce the Probability of a Deflagration to Detonation Transition (DDT),” In Propellants, Explosives, Pyrotechnics, 2016.
ISSN: 1521-4087
DOI: 10.1002/prep.201500331

ABSTRACT

The detonation of hundreds of explosive devices from either a transportation or storage accident is an extremely dangerous event. This paper focuses on identifying ways of packing/storing arrays of explosive cylinders that will reduce the probability of a Deflagration to Detonation Transition (DDT). The Uintah Computational Framework was utilized to predict the conditions necessary for a large scale DDT to occur. The results showed that the arrangement of the explosive cylinders and the number of devices packed in a "box" greatly effects the probability of a detonation.



M. Berzins, J. Beckvermit, T. Harman, A. Bezdjian, A. Humphrey, Q. Meng, J. Schmidt,, C. Wight. “Extending the Uintah Framework through the Petascale Modeling of Detonation in Arrays of High Explosive Devices,” In SIAM Journal on Scientific Computing (Accepted), 2016.

ABSTRACT

The Uintah framework for solving a broad class of fluid-structure interaction problems uses a layered taskgraph approach that decouples the problem specification as a set of tasks from the adaptove runtime system that executes these tasks. Uintah has been developed by using a problem-driven approach that dates back to its inception. Using this approach it is possible to improve the performance of the problem-independent software components to enable the solution of broad classes of problems as well as the driving problem itself. This process is illustrated by a motivating problem that is the computational modeling of the hazards posed by thousands of explosive devices during a Deflagration to Detonation Transition (DDT) that occurred on Highway 6 in Utah. In order to solve this complex fluid-structure interaction problem at the required scale, algorithmic and data structure improvements were needed in a code that already appeared to work well at scale. These transformations enabled scalable runs for our target problem and provided the capability to model the transition to detonation. The performance improvements achieved are shown and the solution to the target problem provides insight as to why the detonation happened, as well as to a possible remediation strategy.



C. Gritton, M. Berzins. “Improving accuracy in the MPM method using a null space filter,” In Computational Particle Mechanics, pp. 1--12. 2016.
ISSN: 2196-4386
DOI: 10.1007/s40571-016-0134-3

ABSTRACT

The material point method (MPM) has been very successful in providing solutions to many challenging problems involving large deformations. Nevertheless there are some important issues that remain to be resolved with regard to its analysis. One key challenge applies to both MPM and particle-in-cell (PIC) methods and arises from the difference between the number of particles and the number of the nodal grid points to which the particles are mapped. This difference between the number of particles and the number of grid points gives rise to a non-trivial null space of the linear operator that maps particle values onto nodal grid point values. In other words, there are non-zero particle values that when mapped to the grid point nodes result in a zero value there. Moreover, when the nodal values at the grid points are mapped back to particles, part of those particle values may be in that same null space. Given positive mapping weights from particles to nodes such null space values are oscillatory in nature. While this problem has been observed almost since the beginning of PIC methods there are still elements of it that are problematical today as well as methods that transcend it. The null space may be viewed as being connected to the ringing instability identified by Brackbill for PIC methods. It will be shown that it is possible to remove these null space values from the solution using a null space filter. This filter improves the accuracy of the MPM methods using an approach that is based upon a local singular value decomposition (SVD) calculation. This local SVD approach is compared against the global SVD approach previously considered by the authors and to a recent MPM method by Zhang and colleagues.



A. Humphrey, D. Sunderland, T. Harman, M. Berzins. “Radiative Heat Transfer Calculation on 16384 GPUs Using a Reverse Monte Carlo Ray Tracing Approach with Adaptive Mesh Refinement,” In 2016 IEEE International Parallel and Distributed Processing Symposium Workshops (IPDPSW), pp. 1222-1231. May, 2016.
DOI: 10.1109/IPDPSW.2016.93

ABSTRACT

Modeling thermal radiation is computationally challenging in parallel due to its all-to-all physical and resulting computational connectivity, and is also the dominant mode of heat transfer in practical applications such as next-generation clean coal boilers, being modeled by the Uintah framework. However, a direct all-to-all treatment of radiation is prohibitively expensive on large computers systems whether homogeneous or heterogeneous. DOE Titan and the planned DOE Summit and Sierra machines are examples of current and emerging GPUbased heterogeneous systems where the increased processing capability of GPUs over CPUs exacerbates this problem. These systems require that computational frameworks like Uintah leverage an arbitrary number of on-node GPUs, while simultaneously utilizing thousands of GPUs within a single simulation. We show that radiative heat transfer problems can be made to scale within Uintah on heterogeneous systems through a combination of reverse Monte Carlo ray tracing (RMCRT) techniques combined with AMR, to reduce the amount of global communication. In particular, significant Uintah infrastructure changes, including a novel lock and contention-free, thread-scalable data structure for managing MPI communication requests and improved memory allocation strategies were necessary to achieve excellent strong scaling results to 16384 GPUs on Titan.



D. Sunderland, B. Peterson, J. Schmidt, A. Humphrey, J. Thornock,, M. Berzins. “An Overview of Performance Portability in the Uintah Runtime System Through the Use of Kokkos,” In Proceedings of the Second Internationsl Workshop on Extreme Scale Programming Models and Middleware, Salt Lake City, Utah, ESPM2, IEEE Press, Piscataway, NJ, USA pp. 44--47. 2016.
ISBN: 978-1-5090-3858-9
DOI: 10.1109/ESPM2.2016.10

ABSTRACT

The current diversity in nodal parallel computer architectures is seen in machines based upon multicore CPUs, GPUs and the Intel Xeon Phi's. A class of approaches for enabling scalability of complex applications on such architectures is based upon Asynchronous Many Task software architectures such as that in the Uintah framework used for the parallel solution of solid and fluid mechanics problems. Uintah has both an applications layer with its own programming model and a separate runtime system. While Uintah scales well today, it is necessary to address nodal performance portability in order for it to continue to do. Incrementally modifying Uintah to use the Kokkos performance portability library through prototyping experiments results in improved kernel performance by more than a factor of two.


2015


J. Bennett, R. Clay, G. Baker, M. Gamell, D. Hollman, S. Knight, H. Kolla, G. Sjaardema, N. Slattengren, K. Teranishi, J. Wilke, M. Bettencourt, S. Bova, K. Franko, P. Lin, R. Grant, S. Hammond, S. Olivier, L. Kale, N. Jain, E. Mikida, A. Aiken, M. Bauer, W. Lee, E. Slaughter, S. Treichler, M. Berzins, T. Harman, A. Humphrey, J. Schmidt, D. Sunderland, P. McCormick, S. Gutierrez, M. Schulz, A. Bhatele, D. Boehme, P. Bremer, T. Gamblin. “ASC ATDM level 2 milestone #5325: Asynchronous many-task runtime system analysis and assessment for next generation platforms,” Sandia National Laboratories, 2015.

ABSTRACT

This report provides in-depth information and analysis to help create a technical road map for developing nextgeneration programming models and runtime systems that support Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) workload requirements. The focus herein is on asynchronous many-task (AMT) model and runtime systems, which are of great interest in the context of "exascale" computing, as they hold the promise to address key issues associated with future extreme-scale computer architectures. This report includes a thorough qualitative and quantitative examination of three best-of-class AMT runtime systems—Charm++, Legion, and Uintah, all of which are in use as part of the ASC Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program II (PSAAP-II) Centers. The studies focus on each of the runtimes' programmability, performance, and mutability. Through the experiments and analysis presented, several overarching findings emerge. From a performance perspective, AMT runtimes show tremendous potential for addressing extremescale challenges. Empirical studies show an AMT runtime can mitigate performance heterogeneity inherent to the machine itself and that Message Passing Interface (MPI) and AMT runtimes perform comparably under balanced conditions. From a programmability and mutability perspective however, none of the runtimes in this study are currently ready for use in developing production-ready Sandia ASC applications. The report concludes by recommending a codesign path forward, wherein application, programming model, and runtime system developers work together to define requirements and solutions. Such a requirements-driven co-design approach benefits the high-performance computing (HPC) community as a whole, with widespread community engagement mitigating risk for both application developers and runtime system developers.



C. Gritton, M. Berzins, R. M. Kirby. “Improving Accuracy In Particle Methods Using Null Spaces and Filters,” In Proceedings of the IV International Conference on Particle-Based Methods - Fundamentals and Applications, Barcelona, Spain, Edited by E. Onate and M. Bischoff and D.R.J. Owen and P. Wriggers and T. Zohdi, CIMNE, pp. 202-213. September, 2015.
ISBN: 978-84-944244-7-2

ABSTRACT

While particle-in-cell type methods, such as MPM, have been very successful in providing solutions to many challenging problems there are some important issues that remain to be resolved with regard to their analysis. One such challenge relates to the difference in dimensionality between the particles and the grid points to which they are mapped. There exists a non-trivial null space of the linear operator that maps particles values onto nodal values. In other words, there are non-zero particle values values that when mapped to the nodes are zero there. Given positive mapping weights such null space values are oscillatory in nature. The null space may be viewed as a more general form of the ringing instability identified by Brackbill for PIC methods. It will be shown that it is possible to remove these null-space values from the solution and so to improve the accuracy of PIC methods, using a matrix SVD approach. The expense of doing this is prohibitive for real problems and so a local method is developed for doing this.



J. K. Holmen, A. Humphrey, M. Berzins. “Exploring Use of the Reserved Core,” In High Performance Parallelism Pearls, Edited by J. Reinders and J. Jeffers, Elsevier, pp. 229-242. 2015.
DOI: 10.1016/b978-0-12-803819-2.00010-0

ABSTRACT

In this chapter, we illustrate benefits of thinking in terms of thread management techniques when using a centralized scheduler model along with interoperability of MPI and PThreads. This is facilitated through an exploration of thread placement strategies for an algorithm modeling radiative heat transfer with special attention to the 61st core. This algorithm plays a key role within the Uintah Computational Framework (UCF) and current efforts taking place at the University of Utah to model next-generation, large-scale clean coal boilers. In such simulations, this algorithm models the dominant form of heat transfer and consumes a large portion of compute time. Exemplified by a real-world example, this chapter presents our early efforts in porting a key portion of a scalability-centric codebase to the Intel ® Xeon PhiTM coprocessor. Specifically, this chapter presents results from our experiments profiling the native execution of a reverse Monte-Carlo ray tracing-based radiation model on a single coprocessor. These results demonstrate that our fastest run confiurations utilized the 61st core and that performance was not profoundly impacted when explicitly over-subscribing the coprocessor operating system thread. Additionally, this chapter presents a portion of radiation model source code, a MIC-centric UCF cross-compilation example, and less conventional thread management techniques for developers utilizing the PThreads threading model.



A. Humphrey, T. Harman, M. Berzins, P. Smith. “A Scalable Algorithm for Radiative Heat Transfer Using Reverse Monte Carlo Ray Tracing,” In High Performance Computing, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Vol. 9137, Edited by Kunkel, Julian M. and Ludwig, Thomas, Springer International Publishing, pp. 212-230. 2015.
ISBN: 978-3-319-20118-4
DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-20119-1_16

ABSTRACT

Radiative heat transfer is an important mechanism in a class of challenging engineering and research problems. A direct all-to-all treatment of these problems is prohibitively expensive on large core counts due to pervasive all-to-all MPI communication. The massive heat transfer problem arising from the next generation of clean coal boilers being modeled by the Uintah framework has radiation as a dominant heat transfer mode. Reverse Monte Carlo ray tracing (RMCRT) can be used to solve for the radiative-flux divergence while accounting for the effects of participating media. The ray tracing approach used here replicates the geometry of the boiler on a multi-core node and then uses an all-to-all communication phase to distribute the results globally. The cost of this all-to-all is reduced by using an adaptive mesh approach in which a fine mesh is only used locally, and a coarse mesh is used elsewhere. A model for communication and computation complexity is used to predict performance of this new method. We show this model is consistent with observed results and demonstrate excellent strong scaling to 262K cores on the DOE Titan system on problem sizes that were previously computationally intractable.

Keywords: Uintah; Radiation modeling; Parallel; Scalability; Adaptive mesh refinement; Simulation science; Titan



R.M. Kirby, M. Berzins, J.S. Hesthaven (Editors). “Spectral and High Order Methods for Partial Differential Equations,” Subtitled “Selected Papers from the ICOSAHOM'14 Conference, June 23-27, 2014, Salt Lake City, UT, USA.,” In Lecture Notes in Computational Science and Engineering, Springer, 2015.



B. Peterson, N. Xiao, J. Holmen, S. Chaganti, A. Pakki, J. Schmidt, D. Sunderland, A. Humphrey, M. Berzins. “Developing Uintah’s Runtime System For Forthcoming Architectures,” Subtitled “Refereed paper presented at the RESPA 15 Workshop at SuperComputing 2015 Austin Texas,” SCI Institute, 2015.



B. Peterson, H. K. Dasari, A. Humphrey, J.C. Sutherland, T. Saad, M. Berzins. “Reducing overhead in the Uintah framework to support short-lived tasks on GPU-heterogeneous architectures,” In Proceedings of the 5th International Workshop on Domain-Specific Languages and High-Level Frameworks for High Performance Computing (WOLFHPC'15), ACM, pp. 4:1-4:8. 2015.
DOI: 10.1145/2830018.2830023



D. Reed, M. Berzins, R. Lucas, S. Matsuoka, R. Pennington, V. Sarkar, V. Taylor. “DOE Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) Report: Exascale Computing Initiative Review,” Note: DOE Report, 2015.
DOI: DOI 10.2172/1222712


2014


A. Dubey, A. Almgren, John Bell, M. Berzins, S. Brandt, G. Bryan, P. Colella, D. Graves, M. Lijewski, F. Löffler, B. O’Shea, E. Schnetter, B. Van Straalen, K. Weide. “A survey of high level frameworks in block-structured adaptive mesh refinement packages,” In Journal of Parallel and Distributed Computing, 2014.
DOI: 10.1016/j.jpdc.2014.07.001

ABSTRACT

Over the last decade block-structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR) has found increasing use in large, publicly available codes and frameworks. SAMR frameworks have evolved along different paths. Some have stayed focused on specific domain areas, others have pursued a more general functionality, providing the building blocks for a larger variety of applications. In this survey paper we examine a representative set of SAMR packages and SAMR-based codes that have been in existence for half a decade or more, have a reasonably sized and active user base outside of their home institutions, and are publicly available. The set consists of a mix of SAMR packages and application codes that cover a broad range of scientific domains. We look at their high-level frameworks, their design trade-offs and their approach to dealing with the advent of radical changes in hardware architecture. The codes included in this survey are BoxLib, Cactus, Chombo, Enzo, FLASH, and Uintah.

Keywords: SAMR, BoxLib, Chombo, FLASH, Cactus, Enzo, Uintah



Z. Fu, H.K. Dasari, M. Berzins, B. Thompson. “Parallel Breadth First Search on GPU Clusters,” SCI Technical Report, No. UUSCI-2014-002, SCI Institute, University of Utah, 2014.

ABSTRACT

Fast, scalable, low-cost, and low-power execution of parallel graph algorithms is important for a wide variety of commercial and public sector applications. Breadth First Search (BFS) imposes an extreme burden on memory bandwidth and network communications and has been proposed as a benchmark that may be used to evaluate current and future parallel computers. Hardware trends and manufacturing limits strongly imply that many core devices, such as NVIDIA® GPUs and the Intel® Xeon Phi®, will become central components of such future systems. GPUs are well known to deliver the highest FLOPS/watt and enjoy a very significant memory bandwidth advantage over CPU architectures. Recent work has demonstrated that GPUs can deliver high performance for parallel graph algorithms and, further, that it is possible to encapsulate that capability in a manner that hides the low level details of the GPU architecture and the CUDA language but preserves the high throughput of the GPU. We extend previous research on GPUs and on scalable graph processing on super-computers and demonstrate that a high-performance parallel graph machine can be created using commodity GPUs and networking hardware.

Keywords: GPU cluster, MPI, BFS, graph, parallel graph algorithm