Designed especially for neurobiologists, FluoRender is an interactive tool for multi-channel fluorescence microscopy data visualization and analysis.
Large scale visualization on the Powerwall.
BrainStimulator is a set of networks that are used in SCIRun to perform simulations of brain stimulation such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and magnetic transcranial stimulation (TMS).
Developing software tools for science has always been a central vision of the SCI Institute.

SCI Publications

2017


C. Gritton, J. Guilkey, J. Hooper, D. Bedrov, R. M. Kirby, M. Berzins. “Using the material point method to model chemical/mechanical coupling in the deformation of a silicon anode,” In Modelling and Simulation in Materials Science and Engineering, Vol. 25, No. 4, pp. 045005. 2017.

ABSTRACT

The lithiation and delithiation of a silicon battery anode is modeled using the material point method (MPM). The main challenges in modeling this process using the MPM is to simulate stress dependent diffusion coupled with concentration dependent stress within a material that undergoes large deformations. MPM is chosen as the numerical method of choice because of its ability to handle large deformations. A method for modeling diffusion within MPM is described. A stress dependent model for diffusivity and three different constitutive models that fully couple the equations for stress with the equations for diffusion are considered. Verifications tests for the accuracy of the numerical implementations of the models and validation tests with experimental results show the accuracy of the approach. The application of the fully coupled stress diffusion model implemented in MPM is applied to modeling the lithiation and delithiation of silicon nanopillars.



T.A.J. Ouermi, A. Knoll, R.M. Kirby, M. Berzins. “OpenMP 4 Fortran Modernization of WSM6 for KNL,” In Proceedings of the Practice and Experience in Advanced Research Computing 2017 on Sustainability, Success and Impact, PEARC17, No. 12, ACM, pp. 12:1--12:8. 2017.
ISBN: 978-1-4503-5272-7
DOI: 10.1145/3093338.3093387

ABSTRACT

Parallel code portability in the petascale era requires modifying existing codes to support new architectures with large core counts and SIMD vector units. OpenMP is a well established and increasingly supported vehicle for portable parallelization. As architectures mature and compiler OpenMP implementations evolve, best practices for code modernization change as well. In this paper, we examine the impact of newer OpenMP features (in particular OMP SIMD) on the Intel Xeon Phi Knights Landing (KNL) architecture, applied in optimizing loops in the single moment 6-class microphysics module (WSM6) in the US Navy's NEPTUNE code. We find that with functioning OMP SIMD constructs, low thread invocation overhead on KNL and reduced penalty for unaligned access compared to previous architectures, one can leverage OpenMP 4 to achieve reasonable scalability with relatively minor reorganization of a production physics code.



T.A.J. Ouermi, A. Knoll, R.M. Kirby, M. Berzins. “Optimization Strategies for WRF Single-Moment 6-Class Microphysics Scheme (WSM6) on Intel Microarchitectures,” In Proceedings of the fifth international symposium on computing and networking (CANDAR 17). Awarded Best Paper , IEEE, 2017.

ABSTRACT

Optimizations in the petascale era require modifications of existing codes to take advantage of new architectures with large core counts and SIMD vector units. This paper examines high-level and low-level optimization strategies for numerical weather prediction (NWP) codes. These strategies employ thread-local structures of arrays (SOA) and an OpenMP directive such as OMP SIMD. These optimization approaches are applied to the Weather Research Forecasting single-moment 6-class microphysics schemes (WSM6) in the US Navy NEPTUNE system. The results of this study indicate that the high-level approach with SOA and low-level OMP SIMD improves thread and vector parallelism by increasing data and temporal locality. The modified version of WSM6 runs 70x faster than the original serial code. This improvement is about 23.3x faster than the performance achieved by Ouermi et al., and 14.9x faster than the performance achieved by Michalakes et al.


2015


T. Etiene, R.M. Kirby, C. Silva. “An Introduction to Verification of Visualization Techniques,” Morgan & Claypool Publishers, 2015.



C. Gritton, M. Berzins, R. M. Kirby. “Improving Accuracy In Particle Methods Using Null Spaces and Filters,” In Proceedings of the IV International Conference on Particle-Based Methods - Fundamentals and Applications, Barcelona, Spain, Edited by E. Onate and M. Bischoff and D.R.J. Owen and P. Wriggers and T. Zohdi, CIMNE, pp. 202-213. September, 2015.
ISBN: 978-84-944244-7-2

ABSTRACT

While particle-in-cell type methods, such as MPM, have been very successful in providing solutions to many challenging problems there are some important issues that remain to be resolved with regard to their analysis. One such challenge relates to the difference in dimensionality between the particles and the grid points to which they are mapped. There exists a non-trivial null space of the linear operator that maps particles values onto nodal values. In other words, there are non-zero particle values values that when mapped to the nodes are zero there. Given positive mapping weights such null space values are oscillatory in nature. The null space may be viewed as a more general form of the ringing instability identified by Brackbill for PIC methods. It will be shown that it is possible to remove these null-space values from the solution and so to improve the accuracy of PIC methods, using a matrix SVD approach. The expense of doing this is prohibitive for real problems and so a local method is developed for doing this.



R.M. Kirby, M. Berzins, J.S. Hesthaven (Editors). “Spectral and High Order Methods for Partial Differential Equations,” Subtitled “Selected Papers from the ICOSAHOM'14 Conference, June 23-27, 2014, Salt Lake City, UT, USA.,” In Lecture Notes in Computational Science and Engineering, Springer, 2015.


2014


H. Bhatia, V. Pascucci, R.M. Kirby, P.-T. Bremer. “Extracting Features from Time-Dependent Vector Fields Using Internal Reference Frames,” In Computer Graphics Forum, Vol. 33, No. 3, pp. 21--30. June, 2014.
DOI: 10.1111/cgf.12358

ABSTRACT

Extracting features from complex, time-dependent flow fields remains a significant challenge despite substantial research efforts, especially because most flow features of interest are defined with respect to a given reference frame. Pathline-based techniques, such as the FTLE field, are complex to implement and resource intensive, whereas scalar transforms, such as λ2, often produce artifacts and require somewhat arbitrary thresholds. Both approaches aim to analyze the flow in a more suitable frame, yet neither technique explicitly constructs one.

This paper introduces a new data-driven technique to compute internal reference frames for large-scale complex flows. More general than uniformly moving frames, these frames can transform unsteady fields, which otherwise require substantial processing of resources, into a sequence of individual snapshots that can be analyzed using the large body of steady-flow analysis techniques. Our approach is simple, theoretically well-founded, and uses an embarrassingly parallel algorithm for structured as well as unstructured data. Using several case studies from fluid flow and turbulent combustion, we demonstrate that internal frames are distinguished, result in temporally coherent structures, and can extract well-known as well as notoriously elusive features one snapshot at a time.



T. Etiene, D. Jonsson, T. Ropinski, C. Scheidegger, J.L.D. Comba, L. G. Nonato, R. M. Kirby, A. Ynnerman,, C. T. Silva. “Verifying Volume Rendering Using Discretization Error Analysis,” In IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VISUALIZATION AND COMPUTER GRAPHICS, Vol. 20, No. 1, IEEE, pp. 140-154. January, 2014.

ABSTRACT

We propose an approach for verification of volume rendering correctness based on an analysis of the volume rendering integral, the basis of most DVR algorithms. With respect to the most common discretization of this continuous model (Riemann summation), we make assumptions about the impact of parameter changes on the rendered results and derive convergence curves describing the expected behavior. Specifically, we progressively refine the number of samples along the ray, the grid size, and the pixel size, and evaluate how the errors observed during refinement compare against the expected approximation errors. We derive the theoretical foundations of our verification approach, explain how to realize it in practice, and discuss its limitations. We also report the errors identified by our approach when applied to two publicly available volume rendering packages.



M. Mirzargar, R. Whitaker, R. M. Kirby. “Curve Boxplot: Generalization of Boxplot for Ensembles of Curves,” In IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, Vol. 20, No. 12, IEEE, pp. 2654-63. December, 2014.

ABSTRACT

In simulation science, computational scientists often study the behavior of their simulations by repeated solutions with variations in parameters and/or boundary values or initial conditions. Through such simulation ensembles, one can try to understand or quantify the variability or uncertainty in a solution as a function of the various inputs or model assumptions. In response to a growing interest in simulation ensembles, the visualization community has developed a suite of methods for allowing users to observe and understand the properties of these ensembles in an efficient and effective manner. An important aspect of visualizing simulations is the analysis of derived features, often represented as points, surfaces, or curves. In this paper, we present a novel, nonparametric method for summarizing ensembles of 2D and 3D curves. We propose an extension of a method from descriptive statistics, data depth, to curves. We also demonstrate a set of rendering and visualization strategies for showing rank statistics of an ensemble of curves, which is a generalization of traditional whisker plots or boxplots to multidimensional curves. Results are presented for applications in neuroimaging, hurricane forecasting and fluid dynamics


2013


T. Etiene, D. Jonsson, T. Ropinski, C. Scheidegger, J. Comba, L. Gustavo Nonato, R.M. Kirby, A. Ynnerman, C.T. Silva. “Verifying Volume Rendering Using Discretization Error Analysis,” SCI Technical Report, No. UUSCI-2013-001, SCI Institute, University of Utah, 2013.

ABSTRACT

We propose an approach for verification of volume rendering correctness based on an analysis of the volume rendering integral, the basis for most DVR algorithms. With respect to the most common discretization of this continuous model, we make assumptions about the impact of parameter changes on the rendered results and derive convergence curves describing the expected behavior. Specifically, we progressively refine the number of samples along the ray, the grid size, and the pixel size, and evaluate how the errors observed during refinement compare against the expected approximation errors. We will derive the theoretical foundations of our verification approach, explain how to realize it in practice and discuss its limitations as well as the identified errors.

Keywords: discretization errors, volume rendering, verifiable visualization



Z. Fu, R.M. Kirby, R.T. Whitaker. “A Fast Iterative Method for Solving the Eikonal Equation on Tetrahedral Domains,” In SIAM Journal on Scientific Computing, Vol. 35, No. 5, pp. C473--C494. 2013.

ABSTRACT

Generating numerical solutions to the eikonal equation and its many variations has a broad range of applications in both the natural and computational sciences. Efficient solvers on cutting-edge, parallel architectures require new algorithms that may not be theoretically optimal, but that are designed to allow asynchronous solution updates and have limited memory access patterns. This paper presents a parallel algorithm for solving the eikonal equation on fully unstructured tetrahedral meshes. The method is appropriate for the type of fine-grained parallelism found on modern massively-SIMD architectures such as graphics processors and takes into account the particular constraints and capabilities of these computing platforms. This work builds on previous work for solving these equations on triangle meshes; in this paper we adapt and extend previous 2D strategies to accommodate three-dimensional, unstructured, tetrahedralized domains. These new developments include a local update strategy with data compaction for tetrahedral meshes that provides solutions on both serial and parallel architectures, with a generalization to inhomogeneous, anisotropic speed functions. We also propose two new update schemes, specialized to mitigate the natural data increase observed when moving to three dimensions, and the data structures necessary for efficiently mapping data to parallel SIMD processors in a way that maintains computational density. Finally, we present descriptions of the implementations for a single CPU, as well as multicore CPUs with shared memory and SIMD architectures, with comparative results against state-of-the-art eikonal solvers.



L.K. Ha, J. King, Z. Fu, R.M. Kirby. “A High-Performance Multi-Element Processing Framework on GPUs,” SCI Technical Report, No. UUSCI-2013-005, SCI Institute, University of Utah, 2013.

ABSTRACT

Many computational engineering problems ranging from finite element methods to image processing involve the batch processing on a large number of data items. While multielement processing has the potential to harness computational power of parallel systems, current techniques often concentrate on maximizing elemental performance. Frameworks that take this greedy optimization approach often fail to extract the maximum processing power of the system for multi-element processing problems. By ultilizing the knowledge that the same operation will be accomplished on a large number of items, we can organize the computation to maximize the computational throughput available in parallel streaming hardware. In this paper, we analyzed weaknesses of existing methods and we proposed efficient parallel programming patterns implemented in a high performance multi-element processing framework to harness the processing power of GPUs. Our approach is capable of levering out the performance curve even on the range of small element size.



M. Hall, R.M. Kirby, F. Li, M.D. Meyer, V. Pascucci, J.M. Phillips, R. Ricci, J. Van der Merwe, S. Venkatasubramanian. “Rethinking Abstractions for Big Data: Why, Where, How, and What,” In Cornell University Library, 2013.

ABSTRACT

Big data refers to large and complex data sets that, under existing approaches, exceed the capacity and capability of current compute platforms, systems software, analytical tools and human understanding [7]. Numerous lessons on the scalability of big data can already be found in asymptotic analysis of algorithms and from the high-performance computing (HPC) and applications communities. However, scale is only one aspect of current big data trends; fundamentally, current and emerging problems in big data are a result of unprecedented complexity |in the structure of the data and how to analyze it, in dealing with unreliability and redundancy, in addressing the human factors of comprehending complex data sets, in formulating meaningful analyses, and in managing the dense, power-hungry data centers that house big data.

The computer science solution to complexity is finding the right abstractions, those that hide as much triviality as possible while revealing the essence of the problem that is being addressed. The "big data challenge" has disrupted computer science by stressing to the very limits the familiar abstractions which define the relevant subfields in data analysis, data management and the underlying parallel systems. Efficient processing of big data has shifted systems towards increasingly heterogeneous and specialized units, with resilience and energy becoming important considerations. The design and analysis of algorithms must now incorporate emerging costs in communicating data driven by IO costs, distributed data, and the growing energy cost of these operations. Data analysis representations as structural patterns and visualizations surpass human visual bandwidth, structures studied at small scale are rare at large scale, and large-scale high-dimensional phenomena cannot be reproduced at small scale.

As a result, not enough of these challenges are revealed by isolating abstractions in a traditional soft-ware stack or standard algorithmic and analytical techniques, and attempts to address complexity either oversimplify or require low-level management of details. The authors believe that the abstractions for big data need to be rethought, and this reorganization needs to evolve and be sustained through continued cross-disciplinary collaboration.

In what follows, we first consider the question of why big data and why now. We then describe the where (big data systems), the how (big data algorithms), and the what (big data analytics) challenges that we believe are central and must be addressed as the research community develops these new abstractions. We equate the biggest challenges that span these areas of big data with big mythological creatures, namely cyclops, that should be conquered.



R.M. Kirby, M.D. Meyer. “Visualization Collaborations: What Works and Why,” In IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications: Visualization Viewpoints, Vol. 33, No. 6, pp. 82--88. 2013.

ABSTRACT

In 1987, Bruce McCormick and his colleagues outlined the current state and future vision of visualization in scientific computing.1 That same year, Donna Cox pioneered her concept of the "Renaissance team"-a multidisciplinary team of experts focused on solving visualization problems.2 Even if a member of the visualization community has never read McCormick and his colleagues' report or heard Donna Cox speak, he or she has probably been affected by some of their ideas.

Of particular interest to us is their vision for collaboration. McCormick and his colleagues envisioned an interdisciplinary team that through close interaction would develop visualization tools that not only were effective in the context of their immediate collaborative environment but also could be reused by scientists and engineers in other fields. McCormick and his colleagues categorized the types of researchers they imagined constituting these teams, one type being the "visualization scientist/engineer." They even commented on the skills these individuals might have. However, they provided little guidance on how to make such teams successful.

In the more than 25 years since the report, researchers have refined the concepts of interaction versus collaboration,3 interdisciplinary versus multidisciplinary teams,4,5 and independence versus interdependence.6 Here, we use observations from our collective 18 years of collaborative visualization research to help shed light on not just the composition of current and future visualization collaborative teams but also pitfalls and recommendations for successful collaboration. Although our statements might reflect what seasoned visualization researchers are already doing, we believe that reexpressing and possibly reaffirming basic collaboration principles provide benefits.



D. Wang, R.M. Kirby, R.S. MacLeod, C.R. Johnson. “Inverse Electrocardiographic Source Localization of Ischemia: An Optimization Framework and Finite Element Solution,” In Journal of Computational Physics, Vol. 250, Academic Press, pp. 403--424. 2013.
ISSN: 0021-9991
DOI: 10.1016/j.jcp.2013.05.027

ABSTRACT

With the goal of non-invasively localizing cardiac ischemic disease using bodysurface potential recordings, we attempted to reconstruct the transmembrane potential (TMP) throughout the myocardium with the bidomain heart model. The task is an inverse source problem governed by partial differential equations (PDE). Our main contribution is solving the inverse problem within a PDE-constrained optimization framework that enables various physically-based constraints in both equality and inequality forms. We formulated the optimality conditions rigorously in the continuum before deriving finite element discretization, thereby making the optimization independent of discretization choice. Such a formulation was derived for the L2-norm Tikhonov regularization and the total variation minimization. The subsequent numerical optimization was fulfilled by a primal-dual interior-point method tailored to our problem's specific structure. Our simulations used realistic, fiberincluded heart models consisting of up to 18,000 nodes, much finer than any inverse models previously reported. With synthetic ischemia data we localized ischemic regions with roughly a 10% false-negative rate or a 20% false-positive rate under conditions up to 5% input noise. With ischemia data measured from animal experiments, we reconstructed TMPs with roughly 0.9 correlation with the ground truth. While precisely estimating the TMP in general cases remains an open problem, our study shows the feasibility of reconstructing TMP during the ST interval as a means of ischemia localization.

Keywords: cvrti, 2P41 GM103545-14



R.T. Whitaker, M. Mirzargar, R.M. Kirby. “Contour Boxplots: A Method for Characterizing Uncertainty in Feature Sets from Simulation Ensembles,” In IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, Vol. 19, No. 12, pp. 2713--2722. December, 2013.
DOI: 10.1109/TVCG.2013.143
PubMed ID: 24051838

ABSTRACT

Ensembles of numerical simulations are used in a variety of applications, such as meteorology or computational solid mechanics, in order to quantify the uncertainty or possible error in a model or simulation. Deriving robust statistics and visualizing the variability of an ensemble is a challenging task and is usually accomplished through direct visualization of ensemble members or by providing aggregate representations such as an average or pointwise probabilities. In many cases, the interesting quantities in a simulation are not dense fields, but are sets of features that are often represented as thresholds on physical or derived quantities. In this paper, we introduce a generalization of boxplots, called contour boxplots, for visualization and exploration of ensembles of contours or level sets of functions. Conventional boxplots have been widely used as an exploratory or communicative tool for data analysis, and they typically show the median, mean, confidence intervals, and outliers of a population. The proposed contour boxplots are a generalization of functional boxplots, which build on the notion of data depth. Data depth approximates the extent to which a particular sample is centrally located within its density function. This produces a center-outward ordering that gives rise to the statistical quantities that are essential to boxplots. Here we present a generalization of functional data depth to contours and demonstrate methods for displaying the resulting boxplots for two-dimensional simulation data in weather forecasting and computational fluid dynamics.


2012


J. King, H. Mirzaee, J.K. Ryan, R.M. Kirby. “Smoothness-Increasing Accuracy-Conserving (SIAC) Filtering for discontinuous Galerkin Solutions: Improved Errors Versus Higher-Order Accuracy,” In Journal of Scientific Computing, Vol. 53, pp. 129--149. 2012.
DOI: 10.1007/s10915-012-9593-8

ABSTRACT

Smoothness-increasing accuracy-conserving (SIAC) filtering has demonstrated its effectiveness in raising the convergence rate of discontinuous Galerkin solutions from order k + 1/2 to order 2k + 1 for specific types of translation invariant meshes (Cockburn et al. in Math. Comput. 72:577–606, 2003; Curtis et al. in SIAM J. Sci. Comput. 30(1):272– 289, 2007; Mirzaee et al. in SIAM J. Numer. Anal. 49:1899–1920, 2011). Additionally, it improves the weak continuity in the discontinuous Galerkin method to k - 1 continuity. Typically this improvement has a positive impact on the error quantity in the sense that it also reduces the absolute errors. However, not enough emphasis has been placed on the difference between superconvergent accuracy and improved errors. This distinction is particularly important when it comes to understanding the interplay introduced through meshing, between geometry and filtering. The underlying mesh over which the DG solution is built is important because the tool used in SIAC filtering—convolution—is scaled by the geometric mesh size. This heavily contributes to the effectiveness of the post-processor. In this paper, we present a study of this mesh scaling and how it factors into the theoretical errors. To accomplish the large volume of post-processing necessary for this study, commodity streaming multiprocessors were used; we demonstrate for structured meshes up to a 50× speed up in the computational time over traditional CPU implementations of the SIAC filter.



B. Nelson, E. Liu, R.M. Kirby, R. Haimes. “ElVis: A System for the Accurate and Interactive Visualization of High-Order Finite Element Solutions,” In IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics (TVCG), Vol. 18, No. 12, pp. 2325--2334. Dec, 2012.
DOI: 10.1109/TVCG.2012.218

ABSTRACT

This paper presents the Element Visualizer (ElVis), a new, open-source scientific visualization system for use with high-order finite element solutions to PDEs in three dimensions. This system is designed to minimize visualization errors of these types of fields by querying the underlying finite element basis functions (e.g., high-order polynomials) directly, leading to pixel-exact representations of solutions and geometry. The system interacts with simulation data through runtime plugins, which only require users to implement a handful of operations fundamental to finite element solvers. The data in turn can be visualized through the use of cut surfaces, contours, isosurfaces, and volume rendering. These visualization algorithms are implemented using NVIDIA's OptiX GPU-based ray-tracing engine, which provides accelerated ray traversal of the high-order geometry, and CUDA, which allows for effective parallel evaluation of the visualization algorithms. The direct interface between ElVis and the underlying data differentiates it from existing visualization tools. Current tools assume the underlying data is composed of linear primitives; high-order data must be interpolated with linear functions as a result. In this work, examples drawn from aerodynamic simulations-high-order discontinuous Galerkin finite element solutions of aerodynamic flows in particular-will demonstrate the superiority of ElVis' pixel-exact approach when compared with traditional linear-interpolation methods. Such methods can introduce a number of inaccuracies in the resulting visualization, making it unclear if visual artifacts are genuine to the solution data or if these artifacts are the result of interpolation errors. Linear methods additionally cannot properly visualize curved geometries (elements or boundaries) which can greatly inhibit developers' debugging efforts. As we will show, pixel-exact visualization exhibits none of these issues, removing the visualization scheme as a source of - ncertainty for engineers using ElVis.



K. Potter, R.M. Kirby, D. Xiu, C.R. Johnson. “Interactive visualization of probability and cumulative density functions,” In International Journal of Uncertainty Quantification, Vol. 2, No. 4, pp. 397--412. 2012.
DOI: 10.1615/Int.J.UncertaintyQuantification.2012004074
PubMed ID: 23543120
PubMed Central ID: PMC3609671

ABSTRACT

The probability density function (PDF), and its corresponding cumulative density function (CDF), provide direct statistical insight into the characterization of a random process or field. Typically displayed as a histogram, one can infer probabilities of the occurrence of particular events. When examining a field over some two-dimensional domain in which at each point a PDF of the function values is available, it is challenging to assess the global (stochastic) features present within the field. In this paper, we present a visualization system that allows the user to examine two-dimensional data sets in which PDF (or CDF) information is available at any position within the domain. The tool provides a contour display showing the normed difference between the PDFs and an ansatz PDF selected by the user, and furthermore allows the user to interactively examine the PDF at any particular position. Canonical examples of the tool are provided to help guide the reader into the mapping of stochastic information to visual cues along with a description of the use of the tool for examining data generated from a uncertainty quantification exercise accomplished within the field of electrophysiology.

Keywords: visualization, probability density function, cumulative density function, generalized polynomial chaos, stochastic Galerkin methods, stochastic collocation methods



H. Tiesler, R.M. Kirby, D. Xiu, T. Preusser. “Stochastic Collocation for Optimal Control Problems with Stochastic PDE Constraints,” In SIAM Journal on Control and Optimization, Vol. 50, No. 5, pp. 2659--2682. 2012.
DOI: 10.1137/110835438

ABSTRACT

We discuss the use of stochastic collocation for the solution of optimal control problems which are constrained by stochastic partial differential equations (SPDE). Thereby the constraining, SPDE depends on data which is not deterministic but random. Assuming a deterministic control, randomness within the states of the input data will propagate to the states of the system. For the solution of SPDEs there has recently been an increasing effort in the development of efficient numerical schemes based upon the mathematical concept of generalized polynomial chaos. Modal-based stochastic Galerkin and nodal-based stochastic collocation versions of this methodology exist, both of which rely on a certain level of smoothness of the solution in the random space to yield accelerated convergence rates. In this paper we apply the stochastic collocation method to develop a gradient descent as well as a sequential quadratic program (SQP) for the minimization of objective functions constrained by an SPDE. The stochastic function involves several higher-order moments of the random states of the system as well as classical regularization of the control. In particular we discuss several objective functions of tracking type. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the performance of our new stochastic collocation minimization approach.

Keywords: stochastic collocation, optimal control, stochastic partial differential equations