Designed especially for neurobiologists, FluoRender is an interactive tool for multi-channel fluorescence microscopy data visualization and analysis.
Large scale visualization on the Powerwall.
BrainStimulator is a set of networks that are used in SCIRun to perform simulations of brain stimulation such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and magnetic transcranial stimulation (TMS).
Developing software tools for science has always been a central vision of the SCI Institute.

General News

downsUniversity of Utah Receives $2.9 Million Grant for Groundbreaking Down Syndrome Research. Studies including Utah families will provide insights into the human brain and treatment strategies for mental disability SALT LAKE CITY – A multidisciplinary team of University of Utah investigators has received a grant for innovative research that will shed new light on the genes that cause Down syndrome (DS), as well as the defects of brain development and function that lead to intellectual disability. The $2.96 million grant co-funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) will support cross-disciplinary research that studies not only genes and brain structure, but also the circuitry and chemical signals within the brain that lead to the development of DS.

kimballFebruary 11, 2012 - April 7, 2012
Art Talk Thursday, March 15th, 6-7pm.
Kimball Art Center, 638 Park Avenue, Park City, UT 84060 

Science and art come together this month at the Kimball Art Center’s Badami Gallery. SCI Institute: The Art of Science  is on display through April 7th, 2012. Some of the world’s most recognized scientists in the computing and imaging field have their ground breaking work on display.

As internationally acclaimed leaders in scientific visualization, researchers at the Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute at the University of Utah work constantly to develop new and better ways to visualize and communicate the results of scientific inquiry.

Although their visual designs are created to serve science, many of SCI’s visualizations of computer simulations of combustion or bioelectric activity in the heart and brain, or of data ranging from a galactic scale down to a cellular level, can also be viewed as works of art.

autismBrain Imaging Differences Evident at 6 Months in High-Risk Infants Who Later Develop Autism A new study led by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill found significant differences in brain development starting at age 6 months in high-risk infants who later develop autism, compared to high-risk infants who did not develop autism.

The study was published online on Feb. 17 at AJP in Advance, a section of the website of the American Journal of Psychiatry. Its results are the latest from the ongoing Infant Brain Imaging Study (IBIS) Network, which is funded by the National Institutes of Health and headquartered at UNC. Piven received an NIH Autism Centers of Excellence (ACE) program network award for the IBIS Network in 2007. ACE networks consist of researchers at many facilities in locations throughout the country, all of whom work together on a single research question.

sc12For 24 years, SC has been at the forefront in gathering the best and brightest minds in supercomputing together, with our unparalleled technical papers, tutorials, posters and speakers. SC12 will take a major step forward not only in supercomputing, but in super-conferencing, with everything designed to make the 2012 conference the most ‘you’ friendly conference in the world. We’re streamlining conference information and moving to a virtually real-time method of determining technical program thrusts. No more pre-determined technical themes picked far in advance. Through social media, data mining, and active polling, we’ll see which technical interests and issues emerge throughout the year, and focus on the ones that interest you the most. The conference welcomes you to participate in the breadth of conference offerings, including:

scix-11University of Utah Media Release
Internationally Recognized Scientific Computing and Imaging (SCI) Institute to Hold Court at Home
SCIx to showcase experts and resources at the University of Utah


October 31, 2011 – People living in the Beehive State might easily pair the words “Utah” and “ski” in a word association game, but not so much for “Utah” and “SCI.” --something organizers of the new open house called SCIx hope to change. SCIx will take place on November 4th. For a list of presentations and full schedule.

U News Centersdc
September 20, 2010 -- University of Utah faculty develop a wealth of software, and they now have a resource that will help them organize, refine and make it more commercially viable. That resource is the Software Development Center, which will open its doors this month in a newly remodeled space in the Technology Commercialization Office located at 615 Arapeen Drive in Research Park. The Software Development Center is a joint effort between the University of Utah's Technology Commercialization Office (TCO), which manages all intellectual property on campus, and the Scientific Computing and Imaging (SCI) Institute.

vis-openhouseSCI will host an open house for Vis Week conference attendees October 28th from 6:30 pm to 9:00pm. Busses will be available to transport guests from the conference to the SCI Institute. Boarding will begin at 6:15pm and will run continuously with the last bus leaving SCI at about 8:45 or 9:00.
hansen-coeSCI faculty Chuck Hansen's career in visualization is prominently featured in the 2010 College of Engineering Research Report.

See: Scientific Visualization: Analyzing and Understanding Complex Data (pdf).
orly-alterOrly Alter has joined the University of Utah’s Scientific Computing and Imaging (SCI) Institute as a USTAR Associate Professor of Bioengineering. The SCI Institute focuses on solving important problems in biomedicine, science, and engineering using computation and is an international research leader in the areas of scientific computing, visualization, and image analysis.

web exteriorThe Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute has begun a new phase of life in the John E. and Marva M. Warnock Engineering Building, a newly constructed, state of the art research facility.

The building is named for two primary donors who helped make it possible. John E. and Marva M. Warnock are both University of Utah alumni and founding pioneers of the information age. John Warnock is a co-founder of Adobe Systems, Inc., an industry leader in the area of graphics, publishing, web, and electronic document technologies. Marva Warnock is a designer and partner with Marsh Design in Palo Alto and also serves on the National Leadership Council for the Utah Museum of Fine Arts at the University of Utah. The project also benefited by a major contribution from Ed Catmull, another University of Utah alumnus who has been a major pioneer in computer technology. Dr. Catmull developed a series of fundamental technologies that made 3D computer graphics possible. He went on to found Pixar Animation Studios and now serves as President of both Pixar and Walt Disney Animation Studios. The Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute is very thankful for the generous contributions by the Warnock family, Ed Catmull and others who made our new home possible.