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SCI Publications

2015


J. Bennett, F. Vivodtzev, V. Pascucci (Eds.). “Topological and Statistical Methods for Complex Data,” Subtitled “Tackling Large-Scale, High-Dimensional, and Multivariate Data Spaces,” Mathematics and Visualization, 2015.
ISBN: 978-3-662-44899-1

ABSTRACT

This book contains papers presented at the Workshop on the Analysis of Large-scale,
High-Dimensional, and Multi-Variate Data Using Topology and Statistics, held in Le Barp,
France, June 2013. It features the work of some of the most prominent and recognized
leaders in the field who examine challenges as well as detail solutions to the analysis of
extreme scale data.
The book presents new methods that leverage the mutual strengths of both topological
and statistical techniques to support the management, analysis, and visualization
of complex data. It covers both theory and application and provides readers with an
overview of important key concepts and the latest research trends.
Coverage in the book includes multi-variate and/or high-dimensional analysis techniques,
feature-based statistical methods, combinatorial algorithms, scalable statistics algorithms,
scalar and vector field topology, and multi-scale representations. In addition, the book
details algorithms that are broadly applicable and can be used by application scientists to
glean insight from a wide range of complex data sets.



CIBC. Note: Data Sets: NCRR Center for Integrative Biomedical Computing (CIBC) data set archive. Download from: http://www.sci.utah.edu/cibc/software.html, 2015.



CIBC. Note: Cleaver: A MultiMaterial Tetrahedral Meshing Library and Application. Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute (SCI), Download from: http://www.sci.utah.edu/cibc/software.html, 2015.



S. Durrleman, T.P. Fletcher, G. Gerig, M. Niethammer, X. Pennec (Eds.). “Spatio-temporal Image Analysis for Longitudinal and Time-Series Image Data,” In Proceedings of the Third International Workshop, STIA 2014, Image Processing, Computer Vision, Pattern Recognition, and Graphics, Vol. 8682, Springer LNCS, 2015.
ISBN: 978-3-319-14905-9

ABSTRACT

This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the Third
International Workshop on Spatio-temporal Image Analysis for Longitudinal and Time-
Series Image Data, STIA 2014, held in conjunction with MICCAI 2014 in Boston, MA, USA, in
September 2014.

The 7 papers presented in this volume were carefully reviewed and selected from 15
submissions. They are organized in topical sections named: longitudinal registration and
shape modeling, longitudinal modeling, reconstruction from longitudinal data, and 4D
image processing.



SCI Institute. Note: FluoRender: An interactive rendering tool for confocal microscopy data visualization. Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute (SCI) Download from: http://www.fluorender.org, 2015.



Note: FusionView: Problem Solving Environment for MHD Visualization. Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute (SCI), Download from: http://www.scirun.org, 2015.



CIBC. Note: ImageVis3D: An interactive visualization software system for large-scale volume data. Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute (SCI), Download from: http://www.imagevis3d.org, 2015.



M. Kim, C.D. Hansen. “Surface Flow Visualization using the Closest Point Embedding,” In 2015 IEEE Pacific Visualization Symposium, April, 2015.

ABSTRACT

In this paper, we introduce a novel flow visualization technique for arbitrary surfaces. This new technique utilizes the closest point embedding to represent the surface, which allows for accurate particle advection on the surface as well as supports the unsteady flow line integral convolution (UFLIC) technique on the surface. This global approach is faster than previous parameterization techniques and prevents the visual artifacts associated with image-based approaches.

Keywords: vector field, flow visualization



M. Kim, C.D. Hansen. “GPU Surface Extraction with the Closest Point Embedding,” In Proceedings of IS&T/SPIE Visualization and Data Analysis, 2015, February, 2015.

ABSTRACT

Isosurface extraction is a fundamental technique used for both surface reconstruction and mesh generation. One method to extract well-formed isosurfaces is a particle system; unfortunately, particle systems can be slow. In this paper, we introduce an enhanced parallel particle system that uses the closest point embedding as the surface representation to speedup the particle system for isosurface extraction. The closest point embedding is used in the Closest Point Method (CPM), a technique that uses a standard three dimensional numerical PDE solver on two dimensional embedded surfaces. To fully take advantage of the closest point embedding, it is coupled with a Barnes-Hut tree code on the GPU. This new technique produces well-formed, conformal unstructured triangular and tetrahedral meshes from labeled multi-material volume datasets. Further, this new parallel implementation of the particle system is faster than any known methods for conformal multi-material mesh extraction. The resulting speed-ups gained in this implementation can reduce the time from labeled data to mesh from hours to minutes and benefits users, such as bioengineers, who employ triangular and tetrahedral meshes.

Keywords: scalar field methods, GPGPU, curvature based, scientific visualization



CIBC. Note: map3d: Interactive scientific visualization tool for bioengineering data. Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute (SCI), Download from: http://www.sci.utah.edu/cibc/software.html, 2015.



K.S. McDowell, S. Zahid, F. Vadakkumpadan, J.J. Blauer, R.S. MacLeod, N.A. Trayanova. “Virtual Electrophysiological Study of Atrial Fibrillation in Fibrotic Remodeling,” In PLoS ONE, Vol. 10, No. 2, pp. e0117110. February, 2015.
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0117110

ABSTRACT

Research has indicated that atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation failure is related to the presence of atrial fibrosis. However it remains unclear whether this information can be successfully used in predicting the optimal ablation targets for AF termination. We aimed to provide a proof-of-concept that patient-specific virtual electrophysiological study that combines i) atrial structure and fibrosis distribution from clinical MRI and ii) modeling of atrial electrophysiology, could be used to predict: (1) how fibrosis distribution determines the locations from which paced beats degrade into AF; (2) the dynamic behavior of persistent AF rotors; and (3) the optimal ablation targets in each patient. Four MRI-based patient-specific models of fibrotic left atria were generated, ranging in fibrosis amount. Virtual electrophysiological studies were performed in these models, and where AF was inducible, the dynamics of AF were used to determine the ablation locations that render AF non-inducible. In 2 of the 4 models patient-specific models AF was induced; in these models the distance between a given pacing location and the closest fibrotic region determined whether AF was inducible from that particular location, with only the mid-range distances resulting in arrhythmia. Phase singularities of persistent rotors were found to move within restricted regions of tissue, which were independent of the pacing location from which AF was induced. Electrophysiological sensitivity analysis demonstrated that these regions changed little with variations in electrophysiological parameters. Patient-specific distribution of fibrosis was thus found to be a critical component of AF initiation and maintenance. When the restricted regions encompassing the meander of the persistent phase singularities were modeled as ablation lesions, AF could no longer be induced. The study demonstrates that a patient-specific modeling approach to identify non-invasively AF ablation targets prior to the clinical procedure is feasible.



SCI Institute. Note: NCR Toolset: A collection of software tools for the reconstruction and visualization of neural circuitry from electron microscopy data. Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute (SCI). Download from: http://www.sci.utah.edu/software.html, 2015.



J.R. Pruett Jr., S. Kandala, S. Hoertel, A.Z. Snyder, J.T. Elison, T. Nishino, E. Feczko, N.U.F. Dosenbach, B. Nardos, J.D. Power, B. Adeyemo, K.N. Botteron, R.C. McKinstry, A.C. Evans, H.C. Hazlett, S.R. Dager, S. Paterson, R.T. Schultz, D.L. Collins, V.S. Fonov, M. Styner, G. Gerig, S. Das, P. Kostopoulos, J.N. Constantino, A.M. Estes, The IBIS Network, S.E. Petersen, B.L. Schlaggar, J. Piven. “Accurate age classification of 6 and 12 month-old infants based on resting-state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging data,” In Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, Vol. 12, pp. 123--133. April, 2015.
DOI: 10.1016/j.dcn.2015.01.003

ABSTRACT

Human large-scale functional brain networks are hypothesized to undergo significant changes over development. Little is known about these functional architectural changes, particularly during the second half of the first year of life. We used multivariate pattern classification of resting-state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) data obtained in an on-going, multi-site, longitudinal study of brain and behavioral development to explore whether fcMRI data contained information sufficient to classify infant age. Analyses carefully account for the effects of fcMRI motion artifact. Support vector machines (SVMs) classified 6 versus 12 month-old infants (128 datasets) above chance based on fcMRI data alone. Results demonstrate significant changes in measures of brain functional organization that coincide with a special period of dramatic change in infant motor, cognitive, and social development. Explorations of the most different correlations used for SVM lead to two different interpretations about functional connections that support 6 versus 12-month age categorization.



A. Salzwedel, K. Grewen, C. Vachet, G. Gerig, W. Lin, W. Gao. “Prenatal Drug Exposure Affects Neonatal Brain Functional Connectivity,” In Journal of Neuroscience, March, 2015.



S. Sankaranarayanan, T.E. Schomay, K.A. Aiello, O. Alter. “Tensor GSVD of patient- and platform-matched tumor and normal DNA copy-number profiles uncovers chromosome arm-wide patterns of tumor-exclusive platform-consistent alterations encoding for cell transformation and predicting ovarian cancer survival,” In PLoS ONE, Vol. 10, No. e121396, 2015.
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0121396



Note: Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute (SCI), University of Utah, www.sci.utah.edu, 2015.



SCI Institute. Note: SCIRun: A Scientific Computing Problem Solving Environment, Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute (SCI), Download from: http://www.scirun.org, 2015.



CIBC. Note: Seg3D: Volumetric Image Segmentation and Visualization. Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute (SCI), Download from: http://www.seg3d.org, 2015.



SCI Institute. Note: ShapeWorks: An open-source tool for constructing compact statistical point-based models of ensembles of similar shapes that does not rely on specific surface parameterization. Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute (SCI). Download from: http://www.sci.utah.edu/software/shapeworks.html, 2015.



SLASH. Note: SLASH: A hybrid system for high-throughput segmentation of large neuropil datasets, SLASH is funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) grant 5R01NS075314-03., 2015.