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SCI Publications

2016


J. Beckvermit, T. Harman, C. Wight, M. Berzins. “Physical Mechanisms of DDT in an Array of PBX 9501 Cylinders Initiation Mechanisms of DDT,” SCI Institute, April, 2016.

ABSTRACT

The Deflagration to Detonation Transition (DDT) in large arrays (100s) of explosive devices is investigated using large-scale computer simulations running the Uintah Computational Framework. Our particular interest is understanding the fundamental physical mechanisms by which convective deflagration of cylindrical PBX 9501 devices can transition to a fully-developed detonation in transportation accidents. The simulations reveal two dominant mechanisms, inertial confinement and Impact to Detonation Transition. In this study we examined the role of physical spacing of the cylinders and how it influenced the initiation of DDT.



M. Berzins, J. Beckvermit, T. Harman, A. Bezdjian, A. Humphrey, Q. Meng, J. Schmidt,, C. Wight. “Extending the Uintah Framework through the Petascale Modeling of Detonation in Arrays of High Explosive Devices,” In SIAM Journal on Scientific Computing (Accepted), 2016.

ABSTRACT

The Uintah framework for solving a broad class of fluid-structure interaction problems uses a layered taskgraph approach that decouples the problem specification as a set of tasks from the adaptove runtime system that executes these tasks. Uintah has been developed by using a problem-driven approach that dates back to its inception. Using this approach it is possible to improve the performance of the problem-independent software components to enable the solution of broad classes of problems as well as the driving problem itself. This process is illustrated by a motivating problem that is the computational modeling of the hazards posed by thousands of explosive devices during a Deflagration to Detonation Transition (DDT) that occurred on Highway 6 in Utah. In order to solve this complex fluid-structure interaction problem at the required scale, algorithmic and data structure improvements were needed in a code that already appeared to work well at scale. These transformations enabled scalable runs for our target problem and provided the capability to model the transition to detonation. The performance improvements achieved are shown and the solution to the target problem provides insight as to why the detonation happened, as well as to a possible remediation strategy.



S. Elhabian, C. Vachet, J. Piven, M. Styner, G. Gerig. “Compressive sensing based Q-space resampling for handling fast bulk motion in hardi acquisitions,” In 2016 IEEE 13th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI), IEEE, pp. 907--910. April, 2016.
DOI: 10.1109/isbi.2016.7493412

ABSTRACT

Diffusion-weighted (DW) MRI has become a widely adopted imaging modality to reveal the underlying brain connectivity. Long acquisition times and/or non-cooperative patients increase the chances of motion-related artifacts. Whereas slow bulk motion results in inter-gradient misalignment which can be handled via retrospective motion correction algorithms, fast bulk motion usually affects data during the application of a single diffusion gradient causing signal dropout artifacts. Common practices opt to discard gradients bearing signal attenuation due to the difficulty of their retrospective correction, with the disadvantage to lose full gradients for further processing. Nonetheless, such attenuation might only affect limited number of slices within a gradient volume. Q-space resampling has recently been proposed to recover corrupted slices while saving gradients for subsequent reconstruction. However, few corrupted gradients are implicitly assumed which might not hold in case of scanning unsedated infants or patients in pain. In this paper, we propose to adopt recent advances in compressive sensing based reconstruction of the diffusion orientation distribution functions (ODF) with under sampled measurements to resample corrupted slices. We make use of Simple Harmonic Oscillator based Reconstruction and Estimation (SHORE) basis functions which can analytically model ODF from arbitrary sampled signals. We demonstrate the impact of the proposed resampling strategy compared to state-of-art resampling and gradient exclusion on simulated intra-gradient motion as well as samples from real DWI data.



S. Elhabian, P. Agrawal, R. Whitaker. “Optimal parameter map estimation for shape representation: A generative approach,” In 2016 IEEE 13th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI), IEEE, pp. 660--663. April, 2016.
DOI: 10.1109/isbi.2016.7493353

ABSTRACT

Probabilistic label maps are a useful tool for important medical image analysis tasks such as segmentation, shape analysis, and atlas building. Existing methods typically rely on blurred signed distance maps or smoothed label maps to model uncertainties and shape variabilities, which do not conform to any generative model or estimation process, and are therefore suboptimal. In this paper, we propose to learn probabilistic label maps using a generative model on given set of binary label maps. The proposed approach generalizes well on unseen data while simultaneously capturing the variability in the training samples. Efficiency of the proposed approach is demonstrated for consensus generation and shape-based clustering using synthetic datasets as well as left atrial segmentations from late-gadolinium enhancement MRI.



Y. Gao, M. Zhang, K. Grewen, P. T. Fletcher, G. Gerig. “Image registration and segmentation in longitudinal MRI using temporal appearance modeling,” In 2016 IEEE 13th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI), IEEE, pp. 629--632. April, 2016.
DOI: 10.1109/isbi.2016.7493346



A.V. P. Grosset, A. Knoll, C.D. Hansen. “Dynamically Scheduled Region-Based Image Compositing,” In Eurographics Symposium on Parallel Graphics and Visualization, June, 2016.

ABSTRACT

Algorithms for sort-last parallel volume rendering on large distributed memory machines usually divide a dataset equally across all nodes for rendering. Depending on the features that a user wants to see in a dataset, all the nodes will rarely finish rendering at the same time. Existing compositing algorithms do not often take this into consideration, which can lead to significant delays when nodes that are compositing wait for other nodes that are still rendering. In this paper, we present an image compositing algorithm that uses spatial and temporal awareness to dynamically schedule the exchange of regions in an image and progressively composite images as they become available. Running on the Edison supercomputer at NERSC, we show that a scheduler-based algorithm with awareness of the spatial contribution from each rendering node can outperform traditional image compositing algorithms.



A. Humphrey, D. Sunderland, T. Harman, M. Berzins. “Radiative Heat Transfer Calculation on 16384 GPUs Using a Reverse Monte Carlo Ray Tracing Approach with Adaptive Mesh Refinement,” In Accepted - The 17th IEEE International Workshop on Parallel and Distributed Scientific and Engineering Computing (PDSEC 2016), 2016.

ABSTRACT

Modeling thermal radiation is computationally challenging in parallel due to its all-to-all physical and resulting computational connectivity, and is also the dominant mode of heat transfer in practical applications such as next-generation clean coal boilers, being modeled by the Uintah framework. However, a direct all-to-all treatment of radiation is prohibitively expensive on large computers systems whether homogeneous or heterogeneous. DOE Titan and the planned DOE Summit and Sierra machines are examples of current and emerging GPUbased heterogeneous systems where the increased processing capability of GPUs over CPUs exacerbates this problem. These systems require that computational frameworks like Uintah leverage an arbitrary number of on-node GPUs, while simultaneously utilizing thousands of GPUs within a single simulation. We show that radiative heat transfer problems can be made to scale within Uintah on heterogeneous systems through a combination of reverse Monte Carlo ray tracing (RMCRT) techniques combined with AMR, to reduce the amount of global communication. In particular, significant Uintah infrastructure changes, including a novel lock and contention-free, thread-scalable data structure for managing MPI communication requests and improved memory allocation strategies were necessary to achieve excellent strong scaling results to 16384 GPUs on Titan.



D. Maljovec, S. Liu, Bei Wang, V. Pascucci, P. T. Bremer, D. Mandelli, C. Smith.. “Analyzing Simulation-Based PRA Data Through Traditional and Topological Clustering: A BWR Station Blackout Case Study,” In Reliability Engineering & System Safety, Vol. 145, Elsevier, pp. 262--276. January, 2016.
DOI: 10.1016/j.ress.2015.07.001

ABSTRACT

Dynamic probabilistic risk assessment (DPRA) methodologies couple system simulator codes (e.g., RELAP, MELCOR) with simulation controller codes (e.g., RAVEN, ADAPT). Whereas system simulator codes model system dynamics deterministically, simulation controller codes introduce both deterministic (e.g., system control logic, operating procedures) and stochastic (e.g., component failures, parameter uncertainties) elements into the simulation. Typically, a DPRA is performed by sampling values of a set of parameters, and simulating the system behavior for that specific set of parameter values. For complex systems, a major challenge in using DPRA methodologies is to analyze the large number of scenarios generated, where clustering techniques are typically employed to better organize and interpret the data. In this paper, we focus on the analysis of two nuclear simulation datasets that are part of the risk-informed safety margin characterization (RISMC) boiling water reactor (BWR) station blackout (SBO) case study. We provide the domain experts a software tool that encodes traditional and topological clustering techniques within an interactive analysis and visualization environment, for understanding the structures of such high-dimensional nuclear simulation datasets. We demonstrate through our case study that both types of clustering techniques complement each other in bringing enhanced structural understanding of the data.



P. Muralidharan, J. Fishbaugh, E. Y. Kim, H. J. Johnson, J. S. Paulsen, G. Gerig, P. T. Fletcher. “Bayesian Covariate Selection in Mixed Effects Models for Longitudinal Shape Analysis,” In International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI), IEEE, April, 2016.
DOI: 10.1109/isbi.2016.7493352

ABSTRACT

The goal of longitudinal shape analysis is to understand how anatomical shape changes over time, in response to biological processes, including growth, aging, or disease. In many imaging studies, it is also critical to understand how these shape changes are affected by other factors, such as sex, disease diagnosis, IQ, etc. Current approaches to longitudinal shape analysis have focused on modeling age-related shape changes, but have not included the ability to handle covariates. In this paper, we present a novel Bayesian mixed-effects shape model that incorporates simultaneous relationships between longitudinal shape data and multiple predictors or covariates to the model. Moreover, we place an Automatic Relevance Determination (ARD) prior on the parameters, that lets us automatically select which covariates are most relevant to the model based on observed data. We evaluate our proposed model and inference procedure on a longitudinal study of Huntington's disease from PREDICT-HD. We first show the utility of the ARD prior for model selection in a univariate modeling of striatal volume, and next we apply the full high-dimensional longitudinal shape model to putamen shapes.



P. Rosen, B. Burton, K. Potter, C.R. Johnson. “muView: A Visual Analysis System for Exploring Uncertainty in Myocardial Ischemia Simulations,” In Visualization in Medicine and Life Sciences III, Springer Nature, pp. 49--69. 2016.
DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-24523-2_3

ABSTRACT

In this paper we describe the Myocardial Uncertainty Viewer (muView or µView) system for exploring data stemming from the simulation of cardiac ischemia. The simulation uses a collection of conductivity values to understand how ischemic regions effect the undamaged anisotropic heart tissue. The data resulting from the simulation is multi-valued and volumetric, and thus, for every data point, we have a collection of samples describing cardiac electrical properties. µView combines a suite of visual analysis methods to explore the area surrounding the ischemic zone and identify how perturbations of variables change the propagation of their effects. In addition to presenting a collection of visualization techniques, which individually highlight different aspects of the data, the coordinated view system forms a cohesive environment for exploring the simulations.We also discuss the findings of our study, which are helping to steer further development of the simulation and strengthening our collaboration with the biomedical engineers attempting to understand the phenomenon.



E. Wong, S. Palande, Bei Wang, B. Zielinski, J. Anderson, P. T. Fletcher. “Kernel Partial Least Squares Regression for Relating Functional Brain Network Topology to Clinical Measures of Behavior,” In 2016 IEEE 13th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI), IEEE, April, 2016.
DOI: 10.1109/isbi.2016.7493506

ABSTRACT

In this paper we present a novel method for analyzing the relationship between functional brain networks and behavioral phenotypes. Drawing from topological data analysis, we first extract topological features using persistent homology from functional brain networks that are derived from correlations in resting-state fMRI. Rather than fixing a discrete network topology by thresholding the connectivity matrix, these topological features capture the network organization across all continuous threshold values. We then propose to use a kernel partial least squares (kPLS) regression to statistically quantify the relationship between these topological features and behavior measures. The kPLS also provides an elegant way to combine multiple image features by using linear combinations of multiple kernels. In our experiments we test the ability of our proposed brain network analysis to predict autism severity from rs-fMRI. We show that combining correlations with topological features gives better prediction of autism severity than using correlations alone.


2015


K.K. Aras, W. Good, J. Tate, B.M. Burton, D.H. Brooks, J. Coll-Font, O. Doessel, W. Schulze, D. Patyogaylo, L. Wang, P. Van Dam,, R.S. MacLeod. “Experimental Data and Geometric Analysis Repository: EDGAR,” In Journal of Electrocardiology, 2015.

ABSTRACT

Introduction
The "Experimental Data and Geometric Analysis Repository", or EDGAR is an Internet-based archive of curated data that are freely distributed to the international research community for the application and validation of electrocardiographic imaging (ECGI) techniques. The EDGAR project is a collaborative effort by the Consortium for ECG Imaging (CEI, ecg-imaging.org), and focused on two specific aims. One aim is to host an online repository that provides access to a wide spectrum of data, and the second aim is to provide a standard information format for the exchange of these diverse datasets.

Methods
The EDGAR system is composed of two interrelated components: 1) a metadata model, which includes a set of descriptive parameters and information, time signals from both the cardiac source and body-surface, and extensive geometric information, including images, geometric models, and measure locations used during the data acquisition/generation; and 2) a web interface. This web interface provides efficient, search, browsing, and retrieval of data from the repository.

Results
An aggregation of experimental, clinical and simulation data from various centers is being made available through the EDGAR project including experimental data from animal studies provided by the University of Utah (USA), clinical data from multiple human subjects provided by the Charles University Hospital (Czech Republic), and computer simulation data provided by the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany).

Conclusions
It is our hope that EDGAR will serve as a communal forum for sharing and distribution of cardiac electrophysiology data and geometric models for use in ECGI research.



J. Bennett, F. Vivodtzev, V. Pascucci (Eds.). “Topological and Statistical Methods for Complex Data,” Subtitled “Tackling Large-Scale, High-Dimensional, and Multivariate Data Spaces,” Mathematics and Visualization, Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2015.
ISBN: 978-3-662-44899-1

ABSTRACT

This book contains papers presented at the Workshop on the Analysis of Large-scale,
High-Dimensional, and Multi-Variate Data Using Topology and Statistics, held in Le Barp,
France, June 2013. It features the work of some of the most prominent and recognized
leaders in the field who examine challenges as well as detail solutions to the analysis of
extreme scale data.
The book presents new methods that leverage the mutual strengths of both topological
and statistical techniques to support the management, analysis, and visualization
of complex data. It covers both theory and application and provides readers with an
overview of important key concepts and the latest research trends.
Coverage in the book includes multi-variate and/or high-dimensional analysis techniques,
feature-based statistical methods, combinatorial algorithms, scalable statistics algorithms,
scalar and vector field topology, and multi-scale representations. In addition, the book
details algorithms that are broadly applicable and can be used by application scientists to
glean insight from a wide range of complex data sets.



J. Bennett, R. Clay, G. Baker, M. Gamell, D. Hollman, S. Knight, H. Kolla, G. Sjaardema, N. Slattengren, K. Teranishi, J. Wilke, M. Bettencourt, S. Bova, K. Franko, P. Lin, R. Grant, S. Hammond, S. Olivier. “ASC ATDM Level 2 Milestone #5325,” Subtitled “Asynchronous Many-Task Runtime System Analysis and Assessment for Next Generation Platforms,” Note: Sandia Report, 2015.

ABSTRACT

This report provides in-depth information and analysis to help create a technical road map for developing nextgeneration programming models and runtime systems that support Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) workload requirements. The focus herein is on asynchronous many-task (AMT) model and runtime systems, which are of great interest in the context of "exascale" computing, as they hold the promise to address key issues associated with future extreme-scale computer architectures. This report includes a thorough qualitative and quantitative examination of three best-of-class AMT runtime systems—Charm++, Legion, and Uintah, all of which are in use as part of the ASC Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program II (PSAAP-II) Centers. The studies focus on each of the runtimes' programmability, performance, and mutability. Through the experiments and analysis presented, several overarching findings emerge. From a performance perspective, AMT runtimes show tremendous potential for addressing extremescale challenges. Empirical studies show an AMT runtime can mitigate performance heterogeneity inherent to the machine itself and that Message Passing Interface (MPI) and AMT runtimes perform comparably under balanced conditions. From a programmability and mutability perspective however, none of the runtimes in this study are currently ready for use in developing production-ready Sandia ASC applications. The report concludes by recommending a codesign path forward, wherein application, programming model, and runtime system developers work together to define requirements and solutions. Such a requirements-driven co-design approach benefits the high-performance computing (HPC) community as a whole, with widespread community engagement mitigating risk for both application developers and runtime system developers.



J. Bennett, R. Clay, G. Baker, M. Gamell, D. Hollman, S. Knight, H. Kolla, G. Sjaardema, N. Slattengren, K. Teranishi, J. Wilke, M. Bettencourt, S. Bova, K. Franko, P. Lin, R. Grant, S. Hammond, S. Olivier, L. Kale, N. Jain, E. Mikida, A. Aiken, M. Bauer, W. Lee, E. Slaughter, S. Treichler, M. Berzins, T. Harman, A. Humphrey, J. Schmidt, D. Sunderland, P. McCormick, S. Gutierrez, M. Schulz, A. Bhatele, D. Boehme, P. Bremer, T. Gamblin. “ASC ATDM level 2 milestone #5325: Asynchronous many-task runtime system analysis and assessment for next generation platforms,” Sandia National Laboratories, 2015.

ABSTRACT

This report provides in-depth information and analysis to help create a technical road map for developing nextgeneration programming models and runtime systems that support Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) workload requirements. The focus herein is on asynchronous many-task (AMT) model and runtime systems, which are of great interest in the context of "exascale" computing, as they hold the promise to address key issues associated with future extreme-scale computer architectures. This report includes a thorough qualitative and quantitative examination of three best-of-class AMT runtime systems—Charm++, Legion, and Uintah, all of which are in use as part of the ASC Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program II (PSAAP-II) Centers. The studies focus on each of the runtimes' programmability, performance, and mutability. Through the experiments and analysis presented, several overarching findings emerge. From a performance perspective, AMT runtimes show tremendous potential for addressing extremescale challenges. Empirical studies show an AMT runtime can mitigate performance heterogeneity inherent to the machine itself and that Message Passing Interface (MPI) and AMT runtimes perform comparably under balanced conditions. From a programmability and mutability perspective however, none of the runtimes in this study are currently ready for use in developing production-ready Sandia ASC applications. The report concludes by recommending a codesign path forward, wherein application, programming model, and runtime system developers work together to define requirements and solutions. Such a requirements-driven co-design approach benefits the high-performance computing (HPC) community as a whole, with widespread community engagement mitigating risk for both application developers and runtime system developers.



H. Bhatia, Bei Wang, G. Norgard, V. Pascucci, P. T. Bremer. “Local, Smooth, and Consistent Jacobi Set Simplification,” In Computational Geometry, Vol. 48, No. 4, Elsevier, pp. 311-332. May, 2015.
DOI: 10.1016/j.comgeo.2014.10.009

ABSTRACT

The relation between two Morse functions defined on a smooth, compact, and orientable 2-manifold can be studied in terms of their Jacobi set. The Jacobi set contains points in the domain where the gradients of the two functions are aligned. Both the Jacobi set itself as well as the segmentation of the domain it induces, have shown to be useful in various applications. In practice, unfortunately, functions often contain noise and discretization artifacts, causing their Jacobi set to become unmanageably large and complex. Although there exist techniques to simplify Jacobi sets, they are unsuitable for most applications as they lack fine-grained control over the process, and heavily restrict the type of simplifications possible.

This paper introduces the theoretical foundations of a new simplification framework for Jacobi sets. We present a new interpretation of Jacobi set simplification based on the perspective of domain segmentation. Generalizing the cancellation of critical points from scalar functions to Jacobi sets, we focus on simplifications that can be realized by smooth approximations of the corresponding functions, and show how these cancellations imply simultaneous simplification of contiguous subsets of the Jacobi set. Using these extended cancellations as atomic operations, we introduce an algorithm to successively cancel subsets of the Jacobi set with minimal modifications to some userdefined metric. We show that for simply connected domains, our algorithm reduces a given Jacobi set to its minimal configuration, that is, one with no birth-death points (a birth-death point is a specific type of singularity within the Jacobi set where the level sets of the two functions and the Jacobi set have a common normal direction).



P. T. Bremer, D. Maljovec, A. Saha, Bei Wang, J. Gaffney, B. K. Spears, V. Pascucci. “ND2AV: N-Dimensional Data Analysis and Visualization -- Analysis for the National Ignition Campaign,” In Computing and Visualization in Science, 2015.

ABSTRACT

One of the biggest challenges in high-energy physics is to analyze a complex mix of experimental and simulation data to gain new insights into the underlying physics. Currently, this analysis relies primarily on the intuition of trained experts often using nothing more sophisticated than default scatter plots. Many advanced analysis techniques are not easily accessible to scientists and not flexible enough to explore the potentially interesting hypotheses in an intuitive manner. Furthermore, results from individual techniques are often difficult to integrate, leading to a confusing patchwork of analysis snippets too cumbersome for data exploration. This paper presents a case study on how a combination of techniques from statistics, machine learning, topology, and visualization can have a significant impact in the field of inertial confinement fusion. We present the ND2AV: N-Dimensional Data Analysis and Visualization framework, a user-friendly tool aimed at exploiting the intuition and current work flow of the target users. The system integrates traditional analysis approaches such as dimension reduction and clustering with state-of-the-art techniques such as neighborhood graphs and topological analysis, and custom capabilities such as defining combined metrics on the fly. All components are linked into an interactive environment that enables an intuitive exploration of a wide variety of hypotheses while relating the results to concepts familiar to the users, such as scatter plots. ND2AV uses a modular design providing easy extensibility and customization for different applications. ND2AV is being actively used in the National Ignition Campaign and has already led to a number of unexpected discoveries.



H. Carr, Z. Geng, J. Tierny, A. Chattophadhyay,, A. Knoll. “Fiber Surfaces: Generalizing Isosurfaces to Bivariate Data,” In Computer Graphics Forum, Vol. 34, No. 3, pp. 241-250. 2015.

ABSTRACT

Scientific visualization has many effective methods for examining and exploring scalar and vector fields, but rather fewer for multi-variate fields. We report the first general purpose approach for the interactive extraction of geometric separating surfaces in bivariate fields. This method is based on fiber surfaces: surfaces constructed from sets of fibers, the multivariate analogues of isolines. We show simple methods for fiber surface definition and extraction. In particular, we show a simple and efficient fiber surface extraction algorithm based on Marching Cubes. We also show how to construct fiber surfaces interactively with geometric primitives in the range of the function. We then extend this to build user interfaces that generate parameterized families of fiber surfaces with respect to arbitrary polylines and polygons. In the special case of isovalue-gradient plots, fiber surfaces capture features geometrically for quantitative analysis that have previously only been analysed visually and qualitatively using multi-dimensional transfer functions in volume rendering. We also demonstrate fiber surface extraction on a variety of bivariate data



CIBC. Note: Data Sets: NCRR Center for Integrative Biomedical Computing (CIBC) data set archive. Download from: http://www.sci.utah.edu/cibc/software.html, 2015.



CIBC. Note: Cleaver: A MultiMaterial Tetrahedral Meshing Library and Application. Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute (SCI), Download from: http://www.sci.utah.edu/cibc/software.html, 2015.