Designed especially for neurobiologists, FluoRender is an interactive tool for multi-channel fluorescence microscopy data visualization and analysis.
Large scale visualization on the Powerwall.
BrainStimulator is a set of networks that are used in SCIRun to perform simulations of brain stimulation such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and magnetic transcranial stimulation (TMS).
Developing software tools for science has always been a central vision of the SCI Institute.

News

Congratulations to Yarden Livnat, who is part of the team who received the 2017 NERSC Award for Innovative Use of HPC for their project on scaling for a realistic simulation of an infectious disease: Massively Parallel Simulations of Spread of Infectious Diseases over Realistic Social Networks

https://www.nersc.gov/news-publications/nersc-news/nersc-center-news/2017/nersc/

EpiSimdemic
visoar 17ViSOAR is set to drive the visualization for the 2017 Workshop on Molecular Genetics of Hematopoietic Neoplasms, September 7-9, in Chicago, IL.

The Scientific Computing and Imaging (SCI) Institute and the Center for Extreme Data Management, Analysis, and Visualization (CEDMAV), in collaboration with ARUP Laboratories and the University of Utah, Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, have developed ViSOAR--a multi platform visualization application for accessing and processing very large imaging data.

DGX 1The SCI Institute, in partner with the School of Computing, is excited to announce the acquisition of an Nvidia DGX-1 deep learning system. This will be a shared resource that will be made available freely to all campus researchers interested in deep learning, machine learning and related areas.

Big data and machine learning are major factors shaping research and innovation now and will continue to be so in the foreseeable future. Deep learning represents the state-of-the-art in machine learning and data analysis.

Research with Fluorender highlighted on the NIH Director's Blog.
Posted on July 27, 2017 by Dr. Francis Collins

muscles limbdevelopment g kardonTwice a week, I do an hour of weight training to maintain muscle strength and tone. Millions of Americans do the same, and there's always a lot of attention paid to those upper arm muscles—the biceps and triceps. Less appreciated is another arm muscle that pumps right along during workouts: the brachialis. This muscle—located under the biceps—helps your elbow flex when you are doing all kinds of things, whether curling a 50-pound barbell or just grabbing a bag of groceries or your luggage out of the car.

for theresaThe University of Utah Neuroscience Initiative recently announced Christopher Butson, PhD, Associate Professor in Bioengineering and the Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute, was awarded funding for his project, "Differentiating Neural Circuits Modulated During Therapeutic Versus Ineffective Deep Brain Stimulation".

wids2017Miriah Meyer, Assistant Professor of Computer Science at University of Utah, sits down with host Lisa Martin at Women in Data Science 2017, at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California.

celebrate UMike Kirby has been chosen as one of two top researchers in the College of Engineering as part of the CELEBRATE U: A Showcase of Extraordinary Faculty Achievements event hosted by the J. Willard Marriott Library and the Office of the Vice President for Research.

University of Utah bioengineers detect early signs of damage in connective tissues such as ligaments, tendons and cartilage

By the time someone realizes they damaged a ligament, tendon or cartilage from too much exercise or other types of physical activity, it's too late. The tissue is stretched and torn and the person is writhing in pain.

But a team of researchers led by University of Utah bioengineering professors Jeffrey Weiss and Michael Yu has discovered that damage to collagen, the main building block of all human tissue, can occur much earlier at a molecular level from too much physical stress, alerting doctors and scientists that a patient is on the path to major tissue damage and pain.

soundartCongratulations to Erik Brunvand and Nina McCurdy whose paper, Making Noise: Using Sound-­Art to Explore Technological Fluency, will receive one of three best paper awards at SIGCSE 2017.

Abstract: We describe our experience designing and delivering a general education technological fluency course that frames the discussion of computer science and engineering technology (electronics and programming) in the context of sound-art: art that uses sound as its medium. This course is aimed at undergraduate students from a wide variety of backgrounds and is designed to fit into the "Intellectual Explorations" area of a general undergraduate program. The goal is to introduce computer engineering and computational principles to non-CS students through an exploration of sound-art, experimental and electronic music, noise-making circuits, hardware hacking, and circuit bending.

aurora espCongratulations to Martin Berzins and the Carbon-Capture Multidisciplinary Simulation Center on their selection as one of ten computational science and engineering research projects for its Aurora Early Science Program starting this month. Aurora, a massively parallel, manycore Intel-Cray supercomputer, will be ALCF's next leadership-class computing resource and is expected to arrive in 2018.