Designed especially for neurobiologists, FluoRender is an interactive tool for multi-channel fluorescence microscopy data visualization and analysis.
Deep brain stimulation
BrainStimulator is a set of networks that are used in SCIRun to perform simulations of brain stimulation such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and magnetic transcranial stimulation (TMS).
Developing software tools for science has always been a central vision of the SCI Institute.

General News

minmaxCongratulations to Bei Wang on her new NSF Award, SCALE MoDL: Advancing Theoretical Minimax Deep Learning: Optimization, Resilience, and Interpretability

The past decade has witnessed the great success of deep learning in broad societal and commercial applications. However, conventional deep learning relies on fitting data with neural networks, which is known to produce models that lack resilience.

Utah Coal 1 0The University of Utah’s Scientific Computing and Imaging (SCI) Institute and Department of Chemical Engineering have been selected by the State of Utah to develop new data exploration and visualization capabilities, create new computer modeling tools to optimize materials, and perform laboratory-scale research on methods to support innovations focused on creating new solid carbon products made from Utah coal.

The world’s most important scientific facilities, from the CERN Large Hadron Collider to the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, deal with massive amounts of data every day that are mined, stored, analyzed and visualized. It’s a colossal task that requires help from the top minds in data management to handle.

Hadron Collider 768x514
The CERN Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland is one of many of the world’s most important scientific facilities and research projects that will get help from team members from the University of Utah’s School of Computing and five other universities on how to best manage their scientific data.

So the National Science Foundation (NSF) is turning to expert computer scientists from the University of Utah’s School of Computing and five other top universities, to help these facilities and other research projects manage their data in faster and more affordable ways.

brains to atlas space Ebin geodesics combined noconnectCongratulations to Kris Campbell and Sarang Joshi for winning the prestigious Erbsmann Prize (Best paper award) of IPMI2021 for the paper:

"Structural Connectome Atlas Construction in the Space of Riemannian Metrics"
KM Campbell, H Dai, Z Su, M Bauer, PT Fletcher, SC Joshi

The IPMI conference series focuses on novel developments in the acquisition, formation, analysis and display of medical images. IPMI places the highest importance on high-quality submissions coupled with presentations and thorough discussions of the presented contributions.
sudhanshuCongratulations to Sudhanshu Sane who had two first authored papers receive Best Paper Awards this week! One was at the International Conference on Computational Science, where more than 650 papers were submitted this year. The Second was at the 2021 Eurographics Symposium on Parallel Graphics and Visualization (EGPGV).

weissCongratulations to Jeff Weiss for receiving the Distinguished Research Award that recognizes outstanding achievement and excellence in scholarly and creative research.

Professor Weiss received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Bioengineering at the University of California, San Diego, his doctorate in Bioengineering at the University of Utah in 1994, and completed postdoctoral training with the Applied Mechanics Group at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (1995-96).

Congratulations to Chuck Hansen on the 5-year renewal of his grant from NASA titled “OpenSpace – An Engine for Dynamic Visualization of Earth and Space Science for Informal Education and Beyond”.

openspace amnh
ENLIL simulation at AMNH's LeFrak theater

Ingo Wald 768x855If it weren’t for an important computer graphics technique seen in special effects for movies known as “ray tracing,” Spider-Man would appear as a flat, lifeless superhero, or Thanos from “The Avengers” would just be a one-dimensional super villain.

Thanks to ray tracing – a computer graphics rendering technique that allows light to interact with objects in a realistic manner – special effects in blockbuster films have an ultra-realistic look that can fool audiences into thinking they are viewing genuine objects. Ingo Wald, a pioneer in ray tracing who conducted much of his work at the University of Utah’s Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute (SCI), will receive a Scientific and Technical Academy Award Feb. 13 along with four other researchers, all of whom developed ray tracing for Intel. They include Sven Woop, Carsten Benthin, Attila T. Áfra and Manfred Ernst.

parashar 278x300National Science Foundation and Office of Science and Technology (OSTP) veteran, Professor Manish Parashar, a distinguished professor of computer science at Rutgers University, will join SCI on January 1, 2021.

“We are thrilled to have a leader like Professor Parashar take the helm at the Institute,” said Dan Reed, senior vice president for Academic Affairs. “He brings an unparalleled depth and breadth of experience in cyberinfrastructure and computer and computational science that will advance SCI as it continues to innovate, grow, and build research collaborations across the entire University of Utah campus.”

ChrisJohnson galaFlyer 600x317 1We are pleased to announce the recipient of The Leonardo Award 2020 is Chris Johnson Ph.D. of the SCI Institute at the University of Utah for his curiosity, creativity and vision. Due to these unprecedented times, the Gala event was held virtually.

The event can be viewed here.

Accumulation of collagen molecular unfolding is the mechanism of cyclic fatigue damage and failure in collagenous tissues

In understanding the failure of dense collagenous soft tissues over multiple loading cycles, the predominant hypothesis for development of overuse injuries is that repeated subfailure loading causes accumulation of “micro-damage”, and when this micro-damage accumulates at a rate that is faster than can be repaired, this results in injury in a clinical sense (tissue failure and resulting pain from the injury and overload of surrounding structures). However the specific nature of this micro-damage has remained unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that the micro-damage is actually collagen molecular unfolding, which accumulates with repeated cyclic loading. Our results provide a convincing explanation for the micro-damage hypothesis: Molecular-level collagen damage is generated by tissue-level loading, and the ability to repair this damage determines whether the applied loading leads to tissue failure.