Designed especially for neurobiologists, FluoRender is an interactive tool for multi-channel fluorescence microscopy data visualization and analysis.
Large scale visualization on the Powerwall.
BrainStimulator is a set of networks that are used in SCIRun to perform simulations of brain stimulation such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and magnetic transcranial stimulation (TMS).
Developing software tools for science has always been a central vision of the SCI Institute.

News

The SCI Institute is proud to announce the availability of SCIRun on the Silicon Graphics PrismTM visualization system. The combination of large memory, parallel CPUs and advanced graphics capabilities on the Silicon Graphics Prism provide an ideal platform for the SCIRun problem solving environment. The modular nature of the Silicon Graphics Prism allows scaling to meet the computational needs of the most demanding SCIRun users.

Using SCIRun's advanced volume rendering PowerApp 'BioImage' we are able to fully exploit the powerful graphics capabilities of the Prism system. The combination with BioImage, the Prism's graphics capabilities and a 64-bit architecture allow for interactive visualization of very large datasets.

science-advisorBy PR and Business Wire News, 9/12/2005 03:36:02 PM MT
Utah Governor Jon M. Huntsman, Jr., has appointed Gregory M. Jones,  PhD as the new State Science Advisor. The position is part of the  Governor's Office of Economic Development (GOED) and oversees the  state's economic clusters to create jobs.

Before joining state government, Dr. Jones was the associate director  of the Scientific Computing and Imaging (SCI) Institute in Salt Lake  City and an adjunct assistant professor of Radiology at the  University of Utah.  He was also president and chief operations  officer of Visual Influence Inc., a spin-off company of SCI.

aaasChris Johnson, a distinguished professor of computer science and director of the Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute, has been elected by his peers as a fellow in the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Johnson is one of 376 AAAS members who were given the distinction this year "because of their efforts toward advancing science applications that are deemed scientifically or socially distinguished," the group says. Johnson specifically was cited "for distinguished contributions to scientific computing and scientific visualization." The AAAS, founded in 1848, is the world's largest general scientific society and publisher of the journal Science, which has an estimated total readership of 1 million.
Dr. Chuck Hansenieee-vis-award has been awarded the 2005 Visualization Technical Achievement Award by the Visualization and Graphics Technical Committee of the IEEE Computer Society (IEEE VGTC). The award is in recognition of "seminal work on tools for understanding large-scale scientific data sets".

This is an international award and is the highest honor and recognition in visualization research.  The IEEE VGTC started this award just last year, so Chuck is the second recipient of the IEEE Visualization Technical Achievement Award.
nvidiaSCI graduate student Guo-Shi Li was selected among many applications for an Nvidia fellowship. This was a highly competitive process and is a great honor for him. Guo-Shi Li's graduate advisor is SCI faculty member Chuck Hansen.

senateChris Johnson, SCI Institute director, testified June 23rd on Capitol Hill before the Congressional Biomedical Research Caucus. His presentation, "Computing the Future of Biomedicine," had a very large turnout, with more than 90 Senate and Congressional Staffers, NIH, NSF and other funding agencies staff, and Congressmen in attendance.

Rush Holt (Rep. New Jersey) followed up Johnson's presentation with a plea for more funding for fundamental research.

vis-handbookThe SCI Institute announces the publication of "The Visualization Handbook," edited by two of SCI visualization faculty, Prof. Charles D. Hansen and Prof. Christopher R. Johnson. This book brings together top experts in the field of scientific visualization to cover state of the art techniques being applied to current scientific problems. A number of the SCI Institute's faculty, research staff, and Ph.D. students have also contributed to the book including Prof. Stephen G. Parker, Prof. Yarden Livnat, Prof. Mike Kirby, Dr. Gordon Kindlmann, Dr. Xavier Tricoche, Joe Kniss, Milan Ikits, and Dean Brederson. Copies may be purchased on the Elsevier web site.
comp-bio-certThe SCI Institute announces a new graduate level certificate program for Computational Bioimaging. The creation of this multidisciplinary program, involving four academic departments, was funded by the Program for Computational Functional Imaging and Visualization through the NIH/NLBI Biomedical Information Science and Technology Initiative (BISTI). The certificate is considered similar to a Graduate Minor at other universities. Graduate students in the program take classes and fulfill the degree requirements from their home department, as well as take classes in basic physiology, cell biology, radiology, computational science, and image/signal processing. Beginning at an introductory level appropriate for this program, the courses will culminate in a project course where students work in interdisciplinary teams on projects that better reflect the true nature of research problems in computational imagining. Upon completion, each student will receive the certificate in Computational Bioimaging as well as the MS or Ph.D. degree from their home department.

For more details on the Computational Bioimaging certificate program.
paracelThe SCI Institute is pleased to announce that Professor Mike Kirby, faculty member in both the School of Computing and SCI Institute at the University of Utah, is the winner of two AMD Opteron cluster nodes provided by Paracel, Inc*. Paracel, a leading provider of applied high-performance computing systems, offered this two-node Paracel Cyclone* Linux cluster as part of a contest on LinuxHPC.org. Professor Kirby's current research interests are in the development and implementation of computational algorithms for solving problems in computational fluid dynamics, solid mechanics and electromagnetics.

frontiersDr. Chris Johnson presented a lecture entitled "Computing the Future of Biomedicine" as part of the University of Utah College of Science's Frontiers of Science Lecture series on March 10. In it he discussed the direction of research in Scientific Computing for medicine and some of the great research going on at SCI. The lecture was held at the Aline Wilmot Skaggs Biology Building.