Designed especially for neurobiologists, FluoRender is an interactive tool for multi-channel fluorescence microscopy data visualization and analysis.
Large scale visualization on the Powerwall.
BrainStimulator is a set of networks that are used in SCIRun to perform simulations of brain stimulation such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and magnetic transcranial stimulation (TMS).
Developing software tools for science has always been a central vision of the SCI Institute.

News

vis-by-analogyThe paper "Querying and Creating Visualizations by Analogy", by Carlos E. Scheidegger, Huy T. Vo, David Koop, Juliana Freire, and Cláudio Silva was selected as the "Best Paper" at IEEE Visualization 2007. In this paper, the authors introduce a new framework that allows users who are not necessarily programmers to query and refine pipelines (or workflows) by analogy. They describe a query-by-example interface which allows users to construct as complex, structure-based queries (e.g., find workflows that resample a data set before extracting an isurface) by example, using the same interface used to build pipelines. They also introduce analogy as a first-class operation to create and refine pipelines. The analogy operation allows casual users to modify pipelines without having to directly edit their definitions. These features have been implemented in their open-source workflow and provenance management system called VisTrails, which can be downloaded from the SCI Website.

Dr. Steve Parkerdarpa has been selected by the Pentagon's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to be a member of the 2008 DARPA . The program supports university researchers with research grants for up to three years, while informing them of the Department of Defense's information technology needs and priorities. Dr. Parker will receive $100,000 the first year, and potentially as much as $750,000 during the second and third years.
capecchiThe NIH Center for Integrative Biomedical Computing (CIBC) and the Scientific Computing and Imaging (SCI) Institute would like to join the international scientific community in extending our heartiest congratulations to our University of Utah colleague Dr. Mario Capecchi as one of the three recipients of the 2007 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. This award recognizes the ground-breaking work of Dr. Capecchi and his scientific contemporaries, Dr. Oliver Smithies of Cardiff University in the UK and Dr. Martin Evans of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, in the development of genetic targeting of embryonic stem cells in mice. This novel technique selectively alters individual genes in the mouse DNA. Through studies employing genetic targeting, medical researchers now can better elucidate the roles that particular genes play in the animal development. The application of this method has revolutionized the study of mammalian biology and contributed to the development of new animal models for numerous human diseases in addition to cancers occurring in mice.

febioThe Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute and the Musculoskeletal Research Laboratories are proud to announce the 1.0 release of the software FEBio, "Finite Elements for Biomechanics". FEBio is a nonlinear finite element software package that is specifically designed to address problems in computational biomechanics. Some of the features of note include capabilities for contact, rigid bodies and kinematic joints, nonlinear anisotropic constitutive models, simulation of active contraction, poroelasticity, element formulations for nearly-incompressible materials and parallel solution of the linear system of equations. After extensive testing in our lab and with our collaborators, we are happy to offer this free software to the research community. FEBio is currently available for WindowsXP, MacOS/X, Suse Linux (64 bit Opteron/Athlon64) and SGI Altix (64 bit Itanium2). We would be happy to port FEBio to other Unix/Linux platforms. The FEBio distribution includes the User's Manual, Theory Manual and several test problems to verify proper operation.

Dr. Claudio Silvaclaudio has been honored once again with a coveted IBM Faculty Award. This award is designed to promote innovative, collaborative research and honor outstanding faculty working in disciplines of interest to IBM. It includes $30,000 to support ongoing research. Dr. Silva is being recognized for his continuing success in developing efficient rendering techniques for large-scale scientific visualization. The increase in computational power has enabled the generation of large and complex simulations. Scientists and engineers are now faced with an incredible amount of data to analyze. Despite considerable effort, techniques for the visualization of large datasets, common in scientific simulations, still take too long. In addition, most current techniques suffer from strict data size limitations due to the reliance on having the complete datasets in main memory. In order to address the interactivity and scalability requirements, the Dr. Silva and his team are developing novel out-of-core, streaming, and parallel algorithms for optimizing the visualization of large datasets. The development of scalable rendering algorithms is of key importance to the advancement of visualization, graphics, and computational science.
mozyAndrew Kensler took the $10,000 grand prize in Mozy.com's Coding Deathmatch. The contest consisted of three timed rounds of competition, two preliminary rounds were held online and the final round at Mozy.com's American Fork (Utah) headquarters. Only the top eight contestants were allowed to proceed to the final round. Contestants were asked to write programs in any of nine possible languages to to solve a series of problems. The winning code was graded on it's ability to solve the problem in the least amount of execution time. The problem for the final round was to write a program that would read through a 2GB file of 20 million records of 100 bytes each. The first 8 bytes represented the key for that record and the remainder was a payload. The program had to write out a file containing just the records that would be in the 0, 1M, 2M, 3M... positions as sorted by the key values. Ties between keys were to be broken by original order in the file. Wall-clock execution time of the correct programs was used to decide the final ranking for the contest. Timings were done on a virtual machine with 1GB of RAM and 4GB of scratch disk space available.

scijumpSCIJump is a computational environment or framework based on the Common Component Architecture (CCA) standard for high performance component frameworks in the scientific computing domain. The SCIJump framework builds on the SCI Institute's SCIRun Problem Solving Environment and implements a parallel component and distributed computation architecture which can support a diverse set of component- based technologies.

nvidiaSCI graduate student Won-Ki Jeong was selected as one of 10 applicants to be awarded the coveted NVIDIA Fellowship Award for 2007-2008. The NVIDIA Fellowship Program provides funding to Ph.D. students who are conducting research on topics which are expected to lead to major advances in the graphics and digital media industry, and are investigating innovative ways of leveraging the power of graphics hardware. Won-Ki Jeong's graduate adviser is SCI faculty member Dr. Ross T. Whitaker.

For more information about the award, please see the NVIDIA press release "NVIDIA Awards Fellowships to Top Ph.D. Innovators."
map3d-6-5The Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute and the Center for Integrative Biomedical Computing are proud to announce the release of map3d version 6.5!

This release includes a number of fixes and additions to the display settings for map3d and major new support for displaying time fiducials. The driving application for this was displaying maps of activation, recovery, start of QRS, etc., both as separate isochronal maps and superimposed on the scalar time series data. If you need this, you will love map3d's new capabilities.

guidoGuido Gerig joins the University of Utah's Scientific Computing and Imaging (SCI) Institute as a USTAR faculty member. The Scientific Computing and Imaging (SCI) Institute has established itself as an international research leader in the areas of scientific computing, scientific visualization, and image processing. USTAR is an innovative, aggressive and far-reaching effort to bolster Utah's economy with high-paying jobs and keep the state vibrant in the Knowledge Age. The USTAR Support Coalition and the Salt Lake Chamber sought public and private investment to recruit world-class research teams in carefully targeted disciplines. These teams will develop products and services that can be commercialized in new businesses and industries.