Designed especially for neurobiologists, FluoRender is an interactive tool for multi-channel fluorescence microscopy data visualization and analysis.
Large scale visualization on the Powerwall.
BrainStimulator is a set of networks that are used in SCIRun to perform simulations of brain stimulation such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and magnetic transcranial stimulation (TMS).
Developing software tools for science has always been a central vision of the SCI Institute.

Events on October 16, 2019

Visualization Seminar

Nathan Morrical Presents:

Efficient Empty Space Skipping and Adaptive Sampling of Unstructured Volumes using Hardware Accelerated Ray Tracing.

October 16, 2019 at 12:00pm for 30min
Evans Conference Room, WEB 3780
Warnock Engineering Building, 3rd floor.

Abstract:

Sample based ray marching is an effective method for direct volume rendering of unstructured meshes. However, sampling such meshes remains expensive, and strategies to reduce the number of samples taken have received relatively little attention. In this paper, we introduce a method for rendering unstructured meshes using a combination of a coarse spatial acceleration structure and hardware-accelerated ray tracing. Our approach enables efficient empty space skipping and adaptive sampling of unstructured meshes, and outperforms a reference ray marched by up to 7X.

Posted by: Steve Petruzza

Visualization Seminar

Steve Petruzza Presents:

High-throughput feature extraction for measuring attributes of deforming open-cell foams

October 16, 2019 at 12:30pm for 30min
Evans Conference Room, WEB 3780
Warnock Engineering Building, 3rd floor.

Abstract:

Metallic open-cell foams are promising structural materials with applications in multifunctional systems such as biomedical implants, energy absorbers in impact, noise mitigation, and batteries. There is a high demand for means to understand and correlate the design space of material performance metrics to the material structure in terms of attributes such as density, ligament and node properties, void sizes, and alignments. Currently, X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) scans of these materials are segmented either manually or with skeletonization approaches that may not accurately model the variety of shapes present in nodes and ligaments, especially irregularities that arise from manufacturing, image artifacts, or deterioration due to compression. In this paper, we present a new workflow for analysis of open-cell foams that combines a new density measurement to identify nodal structures, and topological approaches to identify ligament structures between them. Additionally, we provide automated measurement of foam properties. We demonstrate stable extraction of features and time-tracking in an image sequence of a foam being compressed. Our approach allows researchers to study larger and more complex foams than could previously be segmented only manually, and enables the high-throughput analysis needed to predict future foam performance.

Posted by: Steve Petruzza