The NIH/NIGMS
Center for Integrative Biomedical Computing

cibcSCI is pleased to announce the launch of our new NCRR Center for Integrative Biomedical Computing (CIBC), a five year extension of our previous NCRR center but with a new broader scope. With the new center, we will be conducting exciting research and development that builds upon the successes of previous investments, enhancing our existing strengths, and responding to a set of compelling new biomedical problems. We will continue to develop integrated problem solving environments that make advanced computational tools available to biomedical scientists. We will also continue to pursue advanced research in technical and biophysical approaches to bioelectric field problems in cardiology and neurology. Since the founding of our original NCRR Center, software research has evolved, and so too has our vision of how we can best design software to have the most impact on biomedical research. Integration is still at the core of this vision, though in order to more effectively serve researchers using other systems, we are moving away from our previous strategy of absorbing and incorporating other software into our system to what we call "bridging", in which we provide researchers with the flexibility to link to whatever software systems will meet their needs.
senateChris Johnson, SCI Institute director, testified June 23rd on Capitol Hill before the Congressional Biomedical Research Caucus. His presentation, "Computing the Future of Biomedicine," had a very large turnout, with more than 90 Senate and Congressional Staffers, NIH, NSF and other funding agencies staff, and Congressmen in attendance.

Rush Holt (Rep. New Jersey) followed up Johnson's presentation with a plea for more funding for fundamental research.
frontiersDr. Chris Johnson presented a lecture entitled "Computing the Future of Biomedicine" as part of the University of Utah College of Science's Frontiers of Science Lecture series on March 10. In it he discussed the direction of research in Scientific Computing for medicine and some of the great research going on at SCI. The lecture was held at the Aline Wilmot Skaggs Biology Building.
comp-bio-certThe SCI Institute announces a new graduate level certificate program for Computational Bioimaging. The creation of this multidisciplinary program, involving four academic departments, was funded by the Program for Computational Functional Imaging and Visualization through the NIH/NLBI Biomedical Information Science and Technology Initiative (BISTI). The certificate is considered similar to a Graduate Minor at other universities. Graduate students in the program take classes and fulfill the degree requirements from their home department, as well as take classes in basic physiology, cell biology, radiology, computational science, and image/signal processing. Beginning at an introductory level appropriate for this program, the courses will culminate in a project course where students work in interdisciplinary teams on projects that better reflect the true nature of research problems in computational imagining. Upon completion, each student will receive the certificate in Computational Bioimaging as well as the MS or Ph.D. degree from their home department.

For more details on the Computational Bioimaging certificate program.
For four-year-old Natalie Wright, appearing in front of the state legislature might be just another exciting trip with her family. But, for Governor Mike Leavitt, Natalie represents the fundamental reason for leveraging research and technology within the state of Utah.

Natalie was diagnosed with a brain tumor when she was two years old. Natalie's neurosurgeon knew they had to operate. Natalie's father, John Wright, and neurosurgeon, Dr. Jack Walker called upon the SCI Institute to provide an alternative to conventional technology. Combining years of experience with special techniques in data processing and scientific visualization, Dave Weinstein, Gordon Kindlmann, and Dr. Christopher Johnson created a useful visualization of Natalie's tumor.